Planting in larger pots?

Lincoln, NE(Zone 5b)

I happened upon this page this morning and the writer mentions that the reason Amaryllis are grown in small pots and kept rootbound is to prevent the forming off shoots. I really like the look of some of the ones I have seen that have multiple bulbs and multiple stems all growing in one pot. Have any of you had experience with starting your bulbs in larger pots and with what results?

http://www.amaryllisgarden.com/


Here one of the ones I like with the multiple stems.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=4724931

susan

This message was edited Jan 1, 2009 8:30 AM

Holden, LA(Zone 8b)

I have been growing amaryllis in large pots for several years. I plant them in 16 to 20 inch pots in late Feburary. I plant Impatients around the edge of the pot. When the Amaryllis is finished blooming the Impatients are almost ready to bloom. I leave both plants in the poy until late October or early November then remove the Amaryllis bulbs and allow them to rest in a cool dark place until next Feb. I have had good luck with this. I have not lost a bulb yet and have lots of bublets. Good luck with yours. Hazel

Washington, IN(Zone 6a)

You actually take the bulb from the soil? I always thought they were to be left in the soil and put away until the time to take them out. Let me know for if that is what's to be done I 'll do it.

Holden, LA(Zone 8b)

flowerfantasy, I always take them out of the soil. When I first started growing them many years ago, I left them in the soil, but the bulbs did not do so well. I lost some of my bulbs. After I started taking them out of the soil and laying them up somewhere to rest, I have had no more problems, and they bloom beautifully every spring.

Washington, IN(Zone 6a)

Ok I'll do that then because I don't want to lose mine.
I just got to tell you all what I saw today and I sure didn't know that they would do this. We had to go to the WM and pick up meds and we had to wait on one so we just walked around looking at stuff and I was looking at some of the different Amaryillis that they had there and I picked up this one that was so pretty and got to looking at it and it was blooming and was in no soil or anything and the bloom was coming out of the side of the box it was in. I was so tempted to buy a couple but couldn't afford them right now.

Logansport, IN

I like the larger pots approach. Be especially cautious about getting good drainage. My experience suggests that how much offsetting happens is more variable than the usual discussion suggests. For me, Royal Velvet, Ludwig's Goliath, and Flower Record have all been pretty moderate about offsetting, as in making single new offsets perhaps every other year in pots as large as 12" across and 14" deep, while sending up two and even three scapes on the main bulb each year. The biggest problem is that the display gets in its own way with so many blossoms opening up at the same time as the offsets develop enough to bloom on their own.

The main reason I like larger pots is that they allow for a really hefty mop of roots. If a bulb is really cranking on development, bulking up past 40 cm around/4.5" across, it takes a lot of roots to make it go. It is easier to keep the heavier pot upright.

Lincoln, NE(Zone 5b)

Thanks for all the information everyone. I bought one really large bulb this year and put it in an 8" pot. I was afraid it might not like that large of a pot, but it seems to be doing fine.

Susan

Trenton, MI(Zone 5b)

Susan, I did the larger pot accidently one year ... well out of necessity. I had bought several bulbs at Lowes for $1.00 each and didn't have enough of the smaller pots, so Apple Blossom went into a 10 pot. It blooms and gives me offshoots every year. When they are big enough, I give them to a friend. I keep 3 of the big bulbs in the pot. I haven't done this for my others because I didn't realize it was the size of the pot, I thought this was just an 'Apple Blossom variation'. lol

Jelly, I will have to try the soiless overwintering next winter. I've never lost any of mine in the winter, but I end up changing the soil each spring, and it would be easier to dump the old soil in the fall ... a little messy in March ... too cold to do it outside.

Hobart, IN

I'm late to this thread but have a couple of questions. I bought a white Amaryllis a year ago at HD (all of the big box stores here were carrying them at Christmas). I transferred it from it's plastic non-draining pot into a clay pot the same size. I know they like to be really cozy in their pots and that good drainage is critical. After it bloomed last year, it just really sat around in the GH getting some sun and occasional watering. The pot was really too small to leave outdoors in the summer because the leaves were so big it made the pot top-heavy. I didn't think it would ever bloom again, especially because I didn't stop watering it to let it rest in the late summer (directions assumed that it would bloom again at Christmas). Last week, it started going crazy and has sent up two flower scapes plus a cluster of new leaves (first new leaves in a year). I'm definitely enjoying the blooms in the house (considering it a miracle in spite of my ineptitude) but want to know if I should put it in a larger pot after it's done blooming. There's only about 1 inch of space between the bulb and the pot and it dries out so much that I'm watering it a couple of times a week. Drainage is good but the frequency of watering is bothering me. Is this a candidate for moving to a larger pot? While I haven't taken it out of the pot to inspect the root system, I'm betting that the roots are getting crowded. Is there such a thing as it being too cozy in it's pot? I'm looking forward to your recommendations.

Washington, IN(Zone 6a)

I would repot into a bigger one and it will grow more and put out some little bubils so you could get more of the same flower this way.

Raleigh, NC

Hi Cindy, I'm fairly new at this myself, but what I did last year that worked great for me was to take the bulbs outside after it warmed up enough not to freeze, and transfer them into big planters. I thought this was my own "invention" but sounds like JellyLady does the same thing... I sprinkled Impatiens seeds in the planter around the bulb. I had all these great planters with big strapping leaves in the center surrounded by flowers. I watered and fertilized as I would normally. I lifted the bulbs in Sept - they all had gotten huge and many had grown bulblets. They spent the fall in a closet in the garage hanging in those net bags you get fruit in at Sams. Good luck with yours! Alana

Hobart, IN

Is it generally accepted then that keeping it confined to a smaller pot is solely for keeping the little babies from forming? I don't have a problem with that. I just wanted to make sure there was no other cultural reason for doing that. The directions that came with the plant said to stop watering it Aug/Sep but I would guess that schedule is for reblooming at Christmas? Not a necessity for me. I bring in my canna tubers before frost anyway so I guess I can do the same for the Amaryllis. Is there a minimum temperature for storing out of the soil? I usually store the cannas in my heated garage (minimum 50 degrees) over winter and repot in the spring. Do you think this would work?
Thanks for your suggestions!

Washington, IN(Zone 6a)

Well just make sure you get them in before any kind of frost or low temps. I would bring them bring them in if the temps dropped below 40 degrees in fall of year. Store them in some mesh bags for the time to take them out around the end of OCT and plant for blooms around christmas

Hobart, IN

Flowerfantasy -
I've had recycled mesh bags stored for a year, just waiting for a use. If I'm bringing them in before the frost gets them, do I just cut off all of the foliage even though it might be green?
I do like the idea of making the plant a foliage centerpiece in a big pot. Appreciate that suggestion! What kind of sun exposure do they need? If planted with impatiens, I'm assuming shade or part shade?

Washington, IN(Zone 6a)

Well if they are flowered you don't want to give them a lot of sun causes the flowers to die to fast but after bloom is gone you can give them a lot of sun and not a lot of water. This will help make the foliage die back. But actually the foliage should stay on as long as possible as this give nourishment to the bulb for the next time but it won't hurt if you decide to cut the foliage back, Just might not do as well as before but won' t hurt. If you see that it is getting to cold for them to be outside just bring in and try to let the foliage die back naturally if you decide not to use it in an arrangement.

Raleigh, NC

I put my planters out on the deck in pretty much full sun. The impatiens wilt a little during the middle of the day here in the Carolina sun, but they perk back up in the evening. I keep them pretty well watered and fertilized. I think that the heavy drinking impatiens help keep the bulbs somewhat dry, which is what they prefer. When I brought my bulbs inside late last Sept., they had really increased in size and many had grown bulblets. I had started cutting back on the feeding and watering earlier in the month, then (and I felt bad about this part) I tore off the leaves and most of the roots, leaving about and inch or so on the roots. I put them in those mesh bags I had saved and hung them in the closet in the garage. The only mistake I made that I've promised myself I wouldn't make again was that I didn't label the bulbs when I put them out for the summer then the planters got moved around and I had no idea who was who. This year they are definitely wearing name tags. Alana

Washington, IN(Zone 6a)

Thats A great Idea LOL I have one that I bought that was a noid and I wont be able to find out what it is until it blooms this next fall.

Hobart, IN

Such great suggestions. I'm definitely planning on making the foliage the centerpiece for a pot this season and then I'll lift it in the fall. I won't have to worry about labeling since I have only one. I have one small section of my wooded yard that gets afternoon sun so I think that'll be it's summer home - much better than languishing all alone in the greenhouse.

Raleigh, NC

Ha! Cindy, you might just have only one now, but wait. That was me two years ago. Then when I brought it in, saw how big it had gotten, then was successful with the re-bloom thing I was completely hooked. Just warning you :-) Alana

Hobart, IN

Alana -
Thanks for the warning! I can't really take any credit for the reblooming because all I did was continue to water the thing (even when I shouldn't have). I gave it a bit a fertilizer a few weeks ago and then it exploded with flowers and new leaves. I do think it will be much better off if I do lift it in the fall because something in the greenhouse is chewing up the leaves over the winter. The only pests I have in the GH are aphids (which aren't as bad this year since I didn't overwinter my Abutilon which the aphids love), spider mites (even though I mist my plants about every day) and fungus gnats (which are usually controlled with a dozen yellow sticky traps). The second flower stalk (?) is now blooming and I've already removed the first one. I'm guessing I should fertilize it now?
Hmmm... maybe a peach one???

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