I WILL Thump You on Your Head

Kyla, that was great! My fave was one shot of the buck-toothed Emu & the shot through the Giraffe's neck Thanks for sharing the link!
when I was a teenager I listened to a lot of Bennett, Martin and Platters along with my Rollingstones and I am 99.9% sure that was Dean Martin singing
:-)

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

oh you're probably right, Angele, I am no expert of that stuff, I was just trying to remember who someone said it was singing, anyway, it was pretty! ;-)

it was!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Thanks Kyla for the video. I so want to pet the zebras' soft noses (and ride across the snow). Totems are interesting because different native cultures have different beliefs about them. Some believe they are teachers/guides or they represent an important characteristic of your being or are a complement as Paj says. The attributes associated with an animal/bird/reptile/insect are also different depending on the culture. The bumble bee has been involved in my life in many ways. I think the bumblebee may be my totem because it flys only because it believes it can (physically impossible for it to fly) and I truly believe in many impossible things. Mainly I think it may be my totem because I discovered a bumbler nest in an old birdhouse when I was five and 'investigated it' til my mother saw and snatched me away. The bees just bumbled around and walked on me but no stings.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

Actually the laws of thermodynamics now correspond to the reality that bumblebees actually fly. It is great that bees usually do not sting you if you are not fearful and jumping around. Or dismantling their home, they don't much like that.

And I sing your praises for knowing when to use complement instead of compliment! This is a compliment!

Animal totems often are shamanistic helpers as well.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Very true Mulch and some are familars (a term that has a bad rap because if is usually associated with black witchcraft). Familars are most often companions that inspire and participate in our lives. The Muses are familars of most artists (as Mulch and Roybird and other artists know) I believe we and the animals that live in our homes are familars.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

Yes, and sometimes artists have less well know familiars than the Muses.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Naturally so.

Centennial, CO(Zone 5a)

OK, I just watched the slideshow - nice! My favorite is the zebra closeup. I believe the elegant bird in question is a Crowned Crane and the buck-toothed character is a llama or an alpaca.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

There is a marvelous book about a curandera ( white witch?) in a tiny New Mexico called Bless Me, Ultima. It was written by Rudolofo Anaya of Albuquerque but is popular all over the country. Ultima is a curandera and the author never directly answers the question about her witchness, but she is the guiding light of the main character's life. A truly wonderful book if any of you are looking for something to read. It is a very accurate portrayal of rural New Mexico life after WWII, also. I used to use it with my students and I always had a problem with the parents stealing the kid's copies of the books because they liked it so much. Most of my students were of Hispanic extraction. I figured getting the parents to read was an important part of getting the kids to read, but I only had so many copies -- schools never have enough money for the stuff they need.
Anyhow, Ultima has an owl that follows her around a lot. A familiar, I would say.

Carson City, NV(Zone 6b)

Okay Mulch, I finally found the night-blooming cactus pictures.
http://picasaweb.google.com/janelj54/Tampumachay#

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

Excellent! I love those flowers. The one my friend grew had the sweetest aroma, but they had more petals than these. Were these wonderfully scented?

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Gorgeous pictures, Katlian. I liked the mom and baby goat also -- very cute. I guess those were organ pipe cactus -- the tree like ones? And then there was that very interesting bromiliad looking plant in the tree. Looked like a birds nest with a blooming stalk.

[email protected] myself, of course the bucktoothed creature wasn't an emu. ROFL that was a brain poof

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

There could be a buck-toothed Emu although Edwina would show great disdain if I said that to her. Emus are prideful.

Santa Fe, NM

Nice pictures, Katlian.

Carson City, NV(Zone 6b)

The little restaurant had kid on the menu but were afraid they would walk over to the pen and pick up one of these cute little guys and take it back to the kitchen. It was pretty rural after all. We opted for the "ironed quail," at least we think that was the translation.

March is the dry season so we could see the various epiphytes in the trees and some of them were blooming bright yellow, kind of like giant forsythia trees.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I don't think the laws of thermodynamics have changed to match bees flight. They did get the mechanics right, recognizing the exoskeleton as a big spring that stores energy and sends it back into the wing on each beat.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

Well, my grasp of the laws of thermodynamics is vague in the extreme, so I will be happy to take your word for it!

So what happens when a bee gets sprung?

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

It goes bzzz. :)


I did see this on TV - NatGeo or something similar. Originally someone theorized bees couldn't fly because their wing muscles couldn't supply enough power to propel the bee. They didn't account for the exoskeleton acting like a spring to take up energy from the wings and slow them down at the top and bottom of the stroke, and then to return the energy and help push the wings back across the middle of the stroke. The input energy needed is much lower this way and the bees muscles are quite capable.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Balderdash. They fly because they believe they can.

or because they have a magic feather

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

I think it's also important to note that butterflys fly because they have magic dust on their wings which is why you must never touch their wings.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Very true about the bees and the butterflies.

Also note that the belief in flight and the mechanics are not mutually exclusive. Genetics, music, and flight all follow mathematical, physical rules and are all beautiful. No need to pick one or the other.

Helena, MT(Zone 4b)

I didn't know bees had jails... but I expect they would just get into more trouble once they're sprung.
Bzzoing.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Bee jail cells are 6x6x6 hex.

Denver, CO(Zone 5b)

Paj, I ordered Bless Me, Ultima this afternoon. Thx for the recommendation.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Oh, and t hanks to you for the reminder, I think I want it too and will go looking for it now that I've remembered I want it.

lol

Denver, CO(Zone 5b)

I found it on Ebay for $1.00... check it out.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Oh, too late, I just went to Amazon........... but thanks. We'll have to compare notes when we read it. ;-)

Denver, CO(Zone 5b)

Wow you are quick! I noticed he wrote another one called Albuquerque. Sounds very interesting.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

LOL it's t he "buy with one click" feature, it is a killer. I have to stay away unless I am really sure I want something.

Yes, I saw that one too....... always good to discover a new-to-me author, hope I like this one!

This thread is getting long, we ought to start another but I cannot come up with a good name. I t hink it still has to have "thump" in it......

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I don't think any of Anaya's books are anywhere near as good as Bless Me, Ultima, but it is a masterpiece, in my view. I started Albuquerque and didn't get far. But I don't think you will regret purchasing Ultima -- especially at $1.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

Angele,
Please please start a new thread for this one, taking several lurches to load.

our tales of thumping and miscellany continue here please
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/968331/

Post a Reply to this Thread

You must log in and subscribe to Dave's Garden to post in this thread.
BACK TO TOP