Oregano division and repotting

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I divided and repotted an Oregano x 'Amethyst Falls' tonight. The Oregano's made it apparent to me that was what it needed and now. I had picked it up last fall on sale intending to experience what it was like for a bit and to use it for propagation. It told me in January that it didn't like the humidity in the greenhouse, so I put it on my back step. Much happier there. This month it started putting out new growth - including coming out from underneath the pot. Hmmm. I decided that any more growth would make it that much harder to extricate it from the 1 gallon container and would make it much more difficult to figure out which end goes in the ground.

The plant grows in a fairly horizontal form. The branches (from observation) do a good job of layering. Some of the branches had hit the sides of the container and gone down instead of up. The branches had layered their way along the sides on the inside of the pot and there was new growth at the bottom of the inside and out through the holes in the bottom. All the new growth on the inside of the pot was white. For a while I couldn't tell if it was roots or stems. I decided to at least assume it was stems and plant it that way - leaves up, layered roots in potting mix. Once I had figured out what to do I could actually identify 5 distinct plants that could be divided off the main plant. They are now a family in 6 pots - a momma and 5 babies. Two of the babies are older and were dividable from the top of the original pot.

Observations/notes to self:
These plants really like to cascade. Give them a spot where they can do so.
Nursery pots were NOT designed to accomodate such plants very well. Get them in the dirt before they grow too much.
This Oregano seems to be the most robust of the ones I've tried. It really wants to grow and it is a gorgeous plant. 6 is not too many.

Picture below. Note the plants in three of the smaller pots are more difficult to see because they are white.

Thumbnail by dparsons01
Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

What a beauty dparsons. It sounds like its stoloniferous? I wonder if the seeds are viable.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

I think is stoloniferous dahlianut. The two baby plants up top looked to have been born that way. The plants are gorgeous when in flower.

I don't know if it produces seeds, if the seeds are viable, or if they will produce same-type plants if so. It is a hybrid and it is cutting propagated by High Country Gardens. Are you asking about seeds because you want some?

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

LMAO and here I was trying to be subtle (snort). It's probably sterile if HCG is propagating by cuttings and I don't have a spot for a Zone 5 oregano YET.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

:) I will keep you interest in seeds in mind. I am in process of obtaining seeds for other varieies to try. I have Origanum calcaratum (zone 8) and Origanum laevigatum (zone 5). I found a place that sells seeds for a number of the ornamentals [ http://www.rmrp.com/ ] but mostly too late as they have sold out of many of them for the year. Sigh. The have one Origanum sipyleum that I plan to try. For the 'Amethyst Falls' you might find somebody that isn't concerned about shipping plant materials in a box marked "fragile, dishware" across certain imaginary lines. Then again it might just cost less to buy one on that side of the line.

BTW, have you gotten an envelope from NM yet?

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

There are many that I want to try once I have a new bed for them. These are my fav herbie guys and check out the ' Zorba Red' http://www.richters.com/Web_store/web_store.cgi?show=list&prodclass=Herb_and_Vegetable_Plants&cart_id=3536401.19235

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Nice site dahlianut.

Carson City, NV(Zone 6b)

I've had 'Amethyst Falls' for two years now and I have never seen a seed on it. I have it planted behind a rock so the flowers can drape over the edge. I seem to remeber reading somewhere that it's a sterile hybrid.

This message was edited Feb 27, 2009 2:15 PM

Thumbnail by Katlian
Carson City, NV(Zone 6b)

Oh Dahlia, this calls for a major expansion of the culnary herb bed. It could get expensive.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Resist the temptation to buy 2 of each variety of the herbs.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Herbs are very prolific, aren't they?

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Many are. I suppose like anything else the range from invasive to difficult to get it to spread.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Oh Dahlia. Chocolate boneset. Manchurian baby's breath. Cat thyme.

oh my.

And I was just thinking I need to stop letting eyes get bigger than pocketbook for a while....

but what a lovely resource, thank you for sharing it!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

They are a wonderful supplier. My herb bed is MUCH too small for my herbie dreams. I integrate herbs into my my other beds too but I'm thinking of sweeping the small planting in front of the herb raised bed for more herbs.

Thumbnail by dahlianut
Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Pretty bed dahlianut. I think if I had 3 or 4 acres to devote to the herbs it would be enough. Maybe. I'll just be content with what I have.

Santa Fe, NM

I have some sort of oregano that smells and tastes like culinary oregano. It grows under the roses in the backyard, which means it gets summer shade. It isn't invasive but just hangs in there. Has tiny pinkish flowers and the bees think it is lovely. No idea what kind it is. Herbs grow really well here. What others are you growing Dparson?

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Herbs? I have Spanish Lavender, Rosemary, a dozen varieties of Thyme, Mint, and will be planting Oreganos, Sages, Basils, and others that are herbs but aren't part of the standard culinary list. A couple plants I've picked out because I like the pant I've come across reference to medical or culinary uses that I may get curious enough to try some day.

Santa Fe, NM

Lemon balm does well for me in a shaded area under a tree. Also winter savory in the sun. Valerian is another one that does well for me, but moved itself to a better spot. Tarragon seems to hang in there but would like more water. Many herbs seem to be able to deal with our climate.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Yes, they do like our climate. Many of the traditional herbs are Mediterranean and that is certainly pretty close to New Mexico.

Do you do anything special for the soil for the Lemon Balm roybird? Plants that grow in hot, dry, shade are more difficult to find.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Dparsons I would love to know what all herbs you are growing, especially those ones you say you liked first as plants and then found out they have medicinal or culinary applications......

I have high hopes of growing thyme around here..... as with most other aspects of this project I am not venturing far afield from basics til I see how I do the first season, but I would love to grow many more varieties of herbs......

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Kyla,

I'd like to be able to contribute more but the medicinal aspect is something I've mentally noted but haven't kept track of. Too much else on my thinking priority list. ALL of the plants I've selected because I like them for reasons other than medicinal. Looks, nice smell, flavor, work in a xeric garden (except for one spot special for the culinarys that don't xeric well). I picked one of my Agastaches because it was overall pleasing to look at, had incredible orange/purple/lavender flowers, and it smelled like licorice. I'm going to plant it where it will rub on people that come to my front door. :) I've found statements on medicinal effects for a number of Salvias, Agastaches, Monardella, Manzanita, Lavander?? Helianthemum?? and I don't remember what else. It is as simple as Spearmint being great tasting in salads and tea and also soothing an upset stomach. A lot of members of the mint family seem to have that digestive property.

The site I know of that tracks this type of info is Plants for a Future. They keep a nice database.
http://www.pfaf.org/index.php

I currently have
three varieties of Spanish Lavender (Lavendula soechas) in part because of product mislabeling and because I couldn't get same stock.
two varities of Rosmarinus officinalis - 'Arp' and 'Blue Tuscan' both cold hardy to zone 6
a dozen varieties of Thymus - standard culinary English Thyme and the rest creeping varieties from 3? species. They make a good groundcovers and tolerate foot traffic.
Spearmint

I am designing and growing for a new landscaping in the main part of my front yard. My ideas started with Sages, Oreganos and a couple feature shrubs. I've added Agastaches and a number of other plants along the way. I think Locoweed (Oxytropis) may have other medicinals? The Oxytropis are members of the Pea ( Papilionaceae) family which has lots of Nitrogen fixers. Makes them a primo companion plant. None of these are currently planted in my front yard. Hopefully by Summer they will be.

Below is my list of plants I'm growing or trying to grow or have just plain tried. I have killed a couple - too easily it seemed - and put notes as such. It has more than herbs, but I don't feel like trying to edit it. A couple of the shrubs are for erosion and weed control over my back fence too.

sages
Salvia azurea
Salvia x sylvestris 'Blue Hill'
Salvia greggii 'Wild Thing'
Salvia lycoides greggii x 'Ultra Violet
Salvia oficinalis 'purpureum' - not cold hardy
Salvia farinacea 'Bue Bedder'
Salvia leucantha 'All Purple' (Mexican bush Sage) - not cold hardy
Salvia dorii v. carnosa
Salvia pachyphylla

Oreganos
Origanum x 'Amethyst Falls'
Origanum Libanoticum (Cascading Ornamental Oregano)
Oreganum heracleoticum (true Greek)
Origanum rotundifolium 'Kent Beauty'
Origanum laevigatum 'Hopley's Purple'
Origanum calcaratum
Origanum Laevigatum


Agastache/Hyssop
Agastache rupestris (Licorice Mint / Sunset Hyssop)
Agastache cana (Texas Hummingbird Mint)
Agastache x 'Ava' (Ava's Hummingbird Mint)
Hyssopus officinalis
Agastache neomexicana
Agastache pringlei



Penstemons
Penstemon pinifolius
Penstemon x mexicali 'Pike's Peak Purple'
Penstemon strictus (Rocky Mountain)
Penstemon roezlii
Penstemon fruticosus
Penstemon cyananthus
Penstemon tusharensis
Penstemon paysoniorum
Penstemon aridus
Penstemon janishiae
Penstemon mensarum
Penstemon monoensis
Penstemon secundiflorus
Penstemon serrulatus


Other
Nepeta x faassenii 'Walkers Low' (Catmint)
Aquilegia alpina
Aquilegia barnebyi
Aquilegia caerulea (Rocky Mountain Columbine)
Monardella odoratissima
Campanula aucheri
Phlox grayi
Phlox pulvinata
Stachys lavandulifolia
Helianthemum nummularium Mutabile mix
Helianthemum nummularium 'Evergreen'
Erysimum wheeleri
Oxytropis lagopus (Haresfoot Locoweed)



Groundcovers
Veronica x 'Blue Reflections' (liwanensis x pectina)
Veronica pectinata (Blue Wooly Speedwell)
Veronica oltensis (Thyme-leaf Speedwell)
Veronica liwanensis (Turkish Speedwell)
Veronica umbrosa 'Georgia Blue'
Veronica fruticans 'Alpine'


Mazus reptans
Origanum compacta 'Nana'
Achilea millefolium 'Paprika' (Yarrow)
Aubrieta pinardii
Nepeta phyllochlamys
Thymus fragrantissimus 'Orange Thyme'
Sedum spurium 'Voodoo'
sedum 'October Daphne'

Shrubs
Cistus x pulverulentus 'Sunset' - not likely cold hardy enough
Cistus incanus '' (Downy Rockrose) - not likely cold hardy enough
Cistus x purpureus (Orchid Rock Rose)
Cistus x corabiensis [x hybridus]
Cistus 'Victor Reiter' - too leggy
Cistus laurifolius
Cistus albidus
Arctostaphylos pungens (Manzanita)
Arctostaphylos patula

Chamaebatiaria millefolium (Fernbush)

Carson City, NV(Zone 6b)

Wow, that's quite a list! Sounds like we have a lot of plants in common.

Kyla, I have found that the prostrate thymes (wooly, red, ect.) survive our winters much better than the upright varieties. I have lemon thyme and a variegated culinary thyme that are both barely hanging on. It seems like they die back to just a couple of shoots each winter no matter how I treat them (mulch vs. no mulch, extra water vs. no water, etc.) The wooly thyme has been an absolute champ, it's like a fuzzy green carpet all winter and you can use it for cooking in a pinch, though it's not as strong of a flavor as culinary thyme.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Mine was a fuzzy purple carpet. :) Its greening up again.

Reno, NV

I haven't grown the upright but love my lemon thyme. One of them seems to have died down to a couple shoots but the other 4 still look pretty good. They've turned a really cool purpely red.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

My favorites (so far) are the Thymus heretus and Thymus praecox 'Elfin'

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Thanks very much, d. -- an amazing list indeed and useful also......

Katlian, thanks for the tip about the thyme..... I hope to grow the culinary variety in containers and then see about what I want to put out in the ground..... honestly right now it is even hard to imagine, that anything will grow out there! but that's just the dregs of winter moods I reckon.

Dparsons, I am guessing this is the Agastache with the amazing orange purple licorice flowers? Agastache rupestris (Licorice Mint / Sunset Hyssop) ???

There are several other things on your list I am quite glad to know of as well.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

That is the one. There are other Agastaches that smell like licorice. Pajarito has a different species with a licorice smell.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Well it was the orange purple flower part I was being drawn toward, frankly. The licorice scent is an extra. ;-)

I am kind of on hold tho, waiting for the weather to break, waiting for a clear space in my calendar end of this week to sow some seeds I have not done yet, notably tomatoes, and waiting for a bit of wiggle room in the pocketbook before making more purchases, gosh, there are still tools I need!!!!! When I moved from CA back east to NC in '99 I shipped my spading fork. This time coming back I did not, and now have to replace it.

so pacing myself is the current exercise.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Planning takes time. I like to let things sink in for a bit.

Reno, NV

I know what you mean about tools and money. We're pretty much starting from strach at our place. Tearing out the lawn and makeing it interesting, fixing drainage issues, trying to bring the soil back to health. Sometimes frustrateing but hey at least I don't have to put up with anything hideous:)

Santa Fe, NM

Good list, dparsons! It looks like the kinds of things that grow around here, so all will flourish! if it ever rains again. I'm going to water heavily before we leave on vacation.

Santa Fe, NM

Duchess, you're doing the right thing. Takes more work but pays off in the long run. I have tended to rush in to things which is how I know what Not to do! I still can't bear to thin things out as much as I ought to and I am constantly pulling up grass from the ancient lawn, still! I thought it was all dug out years ago but nasty remnants hid under the mahonia where I couldn't get them!

Reno, NV

I'm really trying to do it right. And on some of it I actualy do:). I suppose it's a really good thing that I like gardens to be a little wild because I rush a little too. We're going to start work on more rasied beds, the side yard this year. I'm also planing a keyhole garden and maybe some strawbales.

Santa Fe, NM

Oh! A keyhole garden is something I really want to try! I only have one spot to put it and it would involve moving some established xeric plants and many spring bulbs. Doubt it will get done this year. I will have to enjoy yours vicariously! Did you see the U-Tube video about them? There was a link I followed from another thread. Really impressive. When I get some concrete removed one day.....

Reno, NV

I've seen a couple vidoes on them but I'll have to check that one out. I guess that is the benifit of starting at the begining:). Should be pretty cool and it's another way to compost. I already have a friend that wants me to teach him once I get mine up. My husband said he'd take photos so then I just have to figure out posting them.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Things like to live. If you do all of your prep work and wait for the soil to change and recuperate before you plant, then you will get lots of weeds. Re-landscaping has aspects that are like a balancing act.

Reno, NV

Oh I hear that. Weeds are still an on going battel for me. I've been thinking of lineing the bottom of the raised beds with newspaper once I get the soil doing better. Then adding on top of it. It's definatly an adventure.

Santa Fe, NM

Some weeds can be instructive and fun. Others are just weeds. It's in the eye of the beholder, or the plans of the gardener. I'm getting ready to take out some Maximillian Sunflowers because they have become weeds to me. Missouri Evening Primrose got to be out of hand a few years back. Arugula threatened to take over everything once and now it is violets!

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

You have a string of successful plant growth there roybird.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Yes, I hope to have some invasives exactly like that. If I can get the Max. sunflowers to take off I will be most pleased. ;-)

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