SOLVED: Weed or not?

Bixby, OK(Zone 7a)

I have no idea what this is. It just sprang up out of my monkey grass (sorry, I know that's not the scientific name) in several different spots. I have monkey grass in my front yard and this stuff is not out there. It's only coming up in the middle or very close to it in the back yard. All of the monkey grass came from the same place...so not only am I clueless as to whether this is a weed or not, but also where the heck it came from! I am in Oklahoma, zone 7, which really doesn't mean that much to me since we set a record high a few days ago in the 80's and as you may be able to see from the pictures it is snowing today!

Thumbnail by Doryb
Bixby, OK(Zone 7a)

Here is a second picture...any help at all will be greatly appreciated.

Thumbnail by Doryb
North Augusta, ON

Almost looks like Tulip leaves.

Bixby, OK(Zone 7a)

This may be a stupid question, but are all tulips from bulbs? I dug one of these up yesterday and there is just a root ball, no bulb or tubor? This has me totally puzzled!

Bretten, Germany

Yes, all tulips grow from bulbs.

Your pics may show Daylilies or Hemerocallis

Raleigh, NC(Zone 7b)

I agree with suse, looks like daylilies to me.

Bixby, OK(Zone 7a)

Okay, I just looked at tons of pictures of daylilies and I would love it if that's what these are! The only thing is that the leaves don't look the same. All the pictures I looked at the leaves were thinner, longer and more swordlike...so I'm still not sure. Any other suggestions?

North Augusta, ON

If they aren't in your way, I'd leave them and see what they do.

Delaware, OH

the center part looks like it will be an invasive week like plant that i have in my area that is sometimes called "wandering jew"
i can't remember the botanical name, starts with a T.don't have time to look up right now, but i pull it out of some of my beds etc. have never had it on my lawn.

Josephine, Arlington, TX(Zone 8a)

I would let them grow, it would be interesting to see what they turn out to be.

Beatrice, NE(Zone 5b)

It does look a lot like some type of Tradescantia (spiderwort), but I don't think it is.

This message was edited Mar 12, 2009 1:02 PM

Delaware, OH

does look like a spiderwort when it emerges, but then has a nasty spreading habit. weed thru and thru.
plant darkens as it matures vs the grassy green color when young.

Westfield, IN

could be seedling day lilies ...instead of from bulbs...thats why leaves are shorter maybe...too long for day flower

Delaware, OH

keep us posted unless you have already yanked it out in a pitch of spring fever!!!!

Bixby, OK(Zone 7a)

I do have spring fever, but unfortunately can't do anything about it as we have snow on the ground today! It is well known in Oklahoma that if you don't like the weather just wait an hour or so! We hit 80 degrees 3 days ago! I will keep you posted & post a pic when and if it flowers. Thanks so much to everyone who has helped.

Rolesville, NC(Zone 7b)

I'd like to cast my vote for Hemerocallis. Many of the newer cultivars are tetraploids (they have four sets of chromosomes) which causes them to have larger flowers and usually larger foliage. The picture here http://greenman857.wordpress.com/2008/03/26/34/ shows a good example of how different daylily foliage can look. Having worked at a nursery for ten years, I've seen many cultivars of daylilies. No, the foliage in question doesn't look like common types like 'Stella d'Oro' but it looks just like many of the tetraploid Trophytaker® dayliles we carried.

San Antonio, TX(Zone 8b)

It resembles false day flower (Commelinantia anomala) when it is first emerging. This plant is not as invasive as the day flowers. It is easily removed if one wishes to do so.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55644/

Cedar Rapids, IA(Zone 5a)

I am not sure what convallaria ~ lily of the valley looks like? but is this it?

Calgary, AB(Zone 3b)

No, it's definitely not convallaria.

EDIT: The only likely possibility that occurs to me is daylily. (There is a slight resemblance to Iris bucharica, except perhaps in the veination, but unless the OP intentionally planted these, and then forgot, it would be unlikely.)


This message was edited Mar 13, 2009 9:14 AM

Seattle, WA(Zone 8b)

It sort of makes me think of Alstroemeria

Coon Rapids, MN(Zone 4a)

My guess would be tawny daylily - it is an aggressive species compare to other daylilies - the leaves strongly resembles this species - most likely the double flower form. Most, not all other daylily cultivars are strongly clumped - I meant why would it sudden appear in a clump of monkey grass. Tawny daylily spread by rhizomes - I had dug up rhizomes at least one foot in length, if not more. 70 to 80% of all daylilies in wild or gardens in most of East US tend to be tawny daylily - even most of the variegated leaved daylilies tend to be tawny daylily with most of the remaining 20% of daylilies stella de oro types. "Fancy" daylilies gets maybe 5% or less thought I wish more people grows them.

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

Tradescantia (Spiderworts http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/485/ ) do greatly resemble daylilies when young. Spiderworts, though, usually get a purplish streak in the leaf veins as the plant matures a bit and the leaves don't retain the "fan" shape as much as daylilies do. For comparison, I will try to get a photo today of one of the (hundreds!) of Spiderwort seedlings that are popping up in my yard now that warm weather has returned.

Jeremy

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

Here is a photo of a young Tradescantia ohiensis.

Jeremy

Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

Here is a photo of a young/small daylily.

Jeremy

Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

And here they are side by side - Tradescantia - Daylily - Doryb's unknown

Jeremy

Thumbnail by JaxFlaGardener
Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

I'm opting for the Tradescantia I.D., but a side view of the leaf structure at ground level of Doryb's plant may help identify the plant.

Jeremy

Central, AL(Zone 7b)

Now that Jeremy has narrowed that down to the Tradescantias list. How about this earnestiana T. ?:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/195867/

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

Thanks, LilyLove. I'm not absolutely certain that the mystery plant is for sure a Tradescantia -- I just wanted to post some photos for comparison. T. earnestiana does not grow in my area, so I can't offer an opinion on it.

Here is a comment HTOP provides in the Plant Files page for T. earnestiana:

Quoting:
Tradescantia ernestiana is easily confused with, T. virginiana. The two species can be distinguished from each other only by the width of the leaf blades and sheath of the distal leaves. T. ernestiana leaf blades are 1 to 4 cm wide with the distal leaf blades wider than sheaths when the sheaths are opened, then flattened. T. virginiana leaf blades are 0.4--2.5 cm wide with the distal leaf blades equal to or narrower than sheaths when the sheaths are opened, then flattened. (Information from Flora of North America, Vol. 22, pp. 179, 180).


I did notice that Doryb's mystery plant had wider leaves than I usually expect to see on T. ohiensis and T. virginiana, so the mystery plant may very well be T. earnestiana . (From a previous comment posted long ago (somewhere buried) in this Plant and Tree I.D. Forum, T. ohiensis and T. virginiana are distinguished from one another only by whether their sepals are smooth or hairy (it takes a good magnifying glass to make that personal intrusion upon the Tradescantia's privacy LOL). If the sepals are "hairy," then it is T. virginiana; if glabrous (smooth), then it is T. ohienis. My plants' sepals are smooth, and T. ohiensis is the species reported as occurring most frequently in Florida, so I am labeling my Spiderworts as T. ohiensis).

Jeremy

North Augusta, ON

Maybe it's just corn? if near a bird feeder...

Cedar Rapids, IA(Zone 5a)

its definetly not corn because the soil is still cold, even in zone 7~ OK, corn needs a very warm soil to even germinate. A daylily could be the answer!

Cedar Rapids, IA(Zone 5a)

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/201
Here is a link to the tawny daylily as suggested above. This plant will grow just about everywhere! And yes it does spread~ so it might be a possibility! I think you are gonna have to wait until it warms up just a bit more though ot make a final call, then you can see how the plant turns out for sure!

Bixby, OK(Zone 7a)

WOW! You guys are amazing! I started out with absolutely no idea and now I have seen some really good suggestions. I can't wait for these things to bloom so I can see what they really are! So...that poses one more question, I really don't want these in the midst of the monkey grass, can I move them without killing them? I would hate to move them and then they never bloom and we never find out what they are! Thanks to all

Central, AL(Zone 7b)

It's spring time -- well almost. Transplanting can easily be done, however, since we don't know what it's. And its timing of blooms. Disturbing the root system now means slowing down its development? I'd wait to see what it 'blosoms' into first, then plan on moving it in the fall when it's in dorman stage.

Delaware, OH

dig it out, put in a pot, take care of it and see what it is that way, vs landscaping around an unknown?

Austell, GA(Zone 7a)

I'm voting for the orange daylily too - I used to have tons of them.

I couldn't remember the correct name - ditchlilies



This message was edited Mar 16, 2009 4:54 PM

Jacksonville, FL(Zone 8b)

Maybe dig out a few and leave a few as a compromise to the question? I think Lily_Love and Clematis are correct that the plant can probably be potted up successfully if you get some of the soil with the roots and keep it in a mostly shady location with continuously moist (but not soggy) soil in the pot.

If it is a Tradescantia, the root system will definitely identify it as such. Part of the reason for the "Spiderwort" (i.e., "spider preventative" or "cure for spider bite") common name is that someone with an overactive imagination decided that the spread of dangling short roots from the central stalk somehow looked like a spider. And so the plant was then thought to aid in spider bites according to the Doctrine of Signatures (a belief that an Almighty stamped clues upon plants so that mortals would know what purpose the plants might serve (e.g., the white spotted leaves of lungwort (Pulmonaria officinalis) resemble a diseased lung and thereby indicate the use of the plant for pulmonary complaints -- for more info: http://www.botgard.ucla.edu/html/botanytextbooks/economicbotany/Doctrine/index.html ) Spiderwort (Tradescantia) roots are fairly shallow (usually not more than about 3 inches below ground level and are easily pulled up when they are growing in loose garden soil). The roots spread in a flat radial pattern from the central plant stem without a lot of branching of the roots.

Digging up one or two would also probably help identify the plant if it is a daylily.

And it may turn out to be something else altogether!

Jeremy

Northern California, United States(Zone 9a)

That's what I was going to say, if you dig it up, take a picture of those roots and you can tell then if it's a daylily or not. The way it's scattered and not held in one clump makes me think it could be one of those aggressive wandering species daylilies and not a hybrid daylily.

De Leon, TX(Zone 8a)

I could definitely be wrong and what I think it is is completely different than other opinions, but it looks just like the new growth of wild reed/wild cane (arundo donax). Someone mentioned it possibly being spiderwort, but I'm in a milder area than you and our spiderwort hasn't started growing yet (my mother's back yard is full of it and I know it will return and I'm in her backyard every day watering my radishes). But the leaves do resemble spiderwort somewhat. Our wild cane has been putting out new growth for at least a couple weeks here maybe more. It's quite possible it could have already started it's spring spurt in your area, especially during your warm spells. It can grow 4 inches a day or more. Here, I've even seen new growth come out the top of supposedly dead canes from the previous year. See my pics and compare and see what you think.

Thumbnail by texasflora_com
De Leon, TX(Zone 8a)

And here's a pic of the full size cane from a couple years ago. This stuff is very widely distributed.

Thumbnail by texasflora_com
Anne Arundel,, MD(Zone 7b)

I vote for daylily.
The last nomination does look good, but I'm guessing that by now the original plant has grown some and we can see if it looks 'caney' at all.
Spiderwort roots will be different from daylily.
I love these diagnostic 'tests!"

I must say, htop has a gorgeous closeup picture of Tradescantia flower in plantfiles at that link.

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