New Rants: Plant Your Rantables Right Here, Y'all!

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

What a pleasure to teach such students. I like the idea of the cruise line classes. DH has often considered hiring out as a ship astronomer since his degrees are in Astrophysics. Of course, he is still working and has a hard time getting away for that long. But I could do it! I have a friend who used to teach college history for the Navy so the sailors could get their degrees while on duty at sea. He spent a lot of time in Japan on those assignments. I wouldn't mind that a bit!

Greensboro, AL

I have some friends who teach on cruise ships off the coast of Mexico. They are archeologists and the programs are sponsored by the University of Mississippi at Starkville.

It would be nice to give yourself and nice vacation! One of my friends spent a summer teaching and excavating on Crete.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

That would be fun to do. I'll bet the students would give you custom tours even.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Yep, I think I would like that. I will see if I can find it on the U of MIss Starkville web site. After I wrote that last, I found a program in Santa Fe that trains volunteers to teach literacy and ESL and that wants volunteers. They require 20 hours of training by them in order to do it. I wouldn't mind that training at all. In fact I would prefer some training rather than the sink or swim method used on regular teachers.
I will also see if I can find out how to teach on the Mexico ships. But I don't know a thing about archaeology. Hope that isn't required.

Greensboro, AL

I meant that I know about the archeology programs. Im sure there must be others. Especially out of the SW like the U of Colorado, New Mexico, or Arizona.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

Oh, well I look up Mississippi State at Starkville and they do offer such courses overseas, but they didn't mention ships. I sent them an email with my credentials. We'll see if they are interested.
I could check out UNM and the others as well.

Greensboro, AL

Sounds like you are on a roll, Paj!

Reno, NV

I'm grumbely at one of the main ESL groups here in town. They just fired my mother in law, because she told her students what the name of the letters was (A instead of just aaaah). It's sad, as it's one of the few places that doesn't need a bunch of money to get into. That and Martha loved her students. She was a librarian most of her life and litteracy is so important to her. Sad that she's gone and the staff that's there do not have her passion.

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

Sorry to hear that duchess :(

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Sorry that happened duchess. More than likely her passion is why they fired her.

Reno, NV

Thanks. It was rough for her. Honestly I'm pretty much possitive she was fired because the director is a *****. I've had to work with her before and I never send my clients to them if I can help it. She's the kind of woman who doesn't understand that yelling isn't going to help anyone learn

Greensboro, AL

Sad for good people to be fired. It is a bad experience to try to recover from.

Santa Fe, NM

It sounds ahhhd to me that someone would be fired for that. The director must be nuts.

Greensboro, AL

I was fired once for "being too old". The woman who fired me had to take her teeth out because she started choking when she came into my office.

[MY teeth do not come out!]

I have learned through my considerable experience that usually older people are not fired for the reasons they are given.

Santa Fe, NM

I was fired from a job once when I was young and I richly deserved it because I spent way too much time on my own goofing off instead of working. And I didn't cover my tracks very well, either! There was nothing I could say or do because I was Way out of line. I was truly busted. I look back and think it was a good lesson for me but at the time I was just crushed and it was my own fault! That's even worse than being fired for no reason!

Greensboro, AL

I was fired several times in my career, but I never deserved it [I don't think!]. Did you ever have to fire anybody, Roybird?

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

I have both fired and been fired, and I prefer the latter, actually....... but none of it is fun.

Duchess, that all sounds so political -- in the not very good sense of the word. Too bad!

sigh

Santa Fe, NM

I was involved with firing two people, not at the same time. I did not make the final decision. It was very unpleasant. One person was re-hired later in a different capacity and ended up to be a great worker! She was just in the wrong job at a bad time for her personally and needed to get a grip. The other really didn't care at all, didn't need the job, etc. No big loss.

Reno, NV

It seems that non profits tend to suffer by promoting people based on how long they've been with the organization, not if they're capable of the new possition. Seen that happen too many times and it never really works out.

Greensboro, AL

I did recommend the firing of a teaching assistant once in graduate school. Later he started hanging out in my classes and at one time confessed to me that he deserved to be fired. He became an A student and a few years later asked me for a recommendation letter because he was applying to graduate school at the University of Colorado. In the letter I said I had witnessed the development of this student through a major transformation and that I would highly recommend him for their graduate program. He got in. I never followed his career but I can imagine he did very well.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Sometimes people need to have limits set so they will decide to be responsible for themselves.

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

I have never been fired, but did get laid off once. The owner of the company was so sorry about it he had already found another job for me, which I took. That was back when the first gold boom hit and the company I worked for went bankrupt over it.

I have never fired anyone, but did lay someone off in our own business. My only mistake was not doing it sooner.

Greensboro, AL

I worked for a Federally funded apartment house for the elderly and disabled - as manager. The local administrator told me they were aware that maintenance man could not read and that if he didn't learn to read he would be fired. It was part of my job to monitor the maintenance man. He hated being monotored.

He learned to read under a veil of extreme secrecy. When his evaluation came up he brought in his job description and read it to me. Then he quit.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

That is strange Gloria. I gather he had a better job offer?

Ennis, MT(Zone 4a)

Adults who cannot read can be hypersensitive about it. And if the decision to have him monitored felt denigrating to him, which is highly probable, he probably asserted himself in a retaliatory fashion that simultaneously established his worth. Makes sense to me.

Greensboro, AL

I think mulchmania hit it on the head. Very hypersensitive and he tried to hate me for interfereing in his business and inquiring about how his reading was coming. Actually, I got around it by having conversations with his wife - who had started literacy teaching and working with him. He got a job managing a fleet of trucks - I think he is doing very well. And he always speaks when he sees me around town so I don't think he hates me any more. Well I got fired from that job, too - not for illiteracy though.

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

I have a new rant... not so much a rant as a big concern. My oldest, best friend of about 27 years who lives back east near Buffalo, NY (where I grew up), called me today to tell me she has to have open heart surgery next week. She is 51 years old. She has 3 (or maybe 4) arteries blocked. She had to do a lot of her own research and pushing her doctors, because she was mis-diagnosed a year and a half ago or so, and put on all kinds of meds... thank God she pushed and heard her own body speak. She is probably the strongest woman I know (besides me), and I know she will be stronger and better after the surgery, but it is heavy duty open heart surgery, and I am 2000 miles away from her. I wished today that I could have been sitting with her at her kitchen table to just be there for her. Sadly, that is not in the budget now, and I feel quite helpless and like a lame friend for not being there. Thankfully, she has an excellent husband, and many other great friends.

I just needed to share. I think I must find a way to be there next week.

Albuquerque, NM(Zone 7b)

Sorry to hear that bsavage. In some ways its harder to have a friend in that situation and to not be able to do anything when you want to so badly. I wish you both well.

Greensboro, AL

bsavage: What a good friend you must be.

I had a similar surgery over the New Years last January. It wasn't heart surgery, but it is the same incision where the sternum is severed to get access to critical organs. It does take a long long time to heal. It sounds like she has quite a lot of support already - if maybe not enough in the medical department.

I don't know how much my experience can be generalized because I am such a loner, and a lot of people make me nervous. But I think it is generally true that when you are facing this kind of ordeal, worrying about the comfort of additional guests in your home can be an added strain.

In my case, my sister came from Michigan to stay through my recovery. She is the only person who probably actually helped rather than caused me more grief (!) I needed practical help. I arranged for her to have access to my house and be there when I was released from the hospital. I needed someone else to get to the hospital which is some 40 miles away. I needed to get my dogs into a safe kennel and over Christmas vacation the local one's were all full.

The person who drove me to the hospital insisted on staying until I was in recovery after the surgery. I awoke to find her praying over me. I found this very disturbing - it is something I had discussed with her previously and I had told her this is something SHE believes in not something I believe in. I was in no shape to object at that point. She even brought in reinforcements and had several of her friends with her - so I was in a position of meeting strangers in my nightgown!

Several days later when I was to be released and meet my sister at home, I found the person had arranged to have me released to a convelescent home [which was also a hospice]. Because of her interference my release from the hospital was delayed several days and my dogs had to stay extra days in the kennel. Of course I had to pay for all this. Meanwhile my sister was at my house waiting for me to get there.

My point is that some times people want to "help" but they don't have practical things to offer. A person facing a life/death situation - which open heart surgery is - really needs to concentrate and have a worry free experience. There were immediate problems. I found that in the hospital I had missed several meals and it wasn't clear to me how I was supposed to be fed. My arm had been partially paralized from the IV and I needed to convince someone that something was seriously wrong. The wires in my chest felt strange and I was afraid to move.

One thing I did enjoy was a phone call from my younger brother one evening - I had not spoken to him in over 25 years so that was a little strange.

After I finally did get home there was a home nurse who checked up on me for a few weeks. My only problem really was managing my dogs - since the little greyhound likes to jerk and does not behave on a leash. I couldn't lift anything. Even loading cans of food at the store into the shopping cart was very hard to do. I invented ways slide heavy objects onto the cart without lifting them. When I got home I had a luggage cart to get my groceries from my car into the house.

I had bad reactions to some of the medications - dizziness and feeling stupid. There was so much to learn - new routines. I needed to clean my house. Everything was chaos!

Anyhow - what I would suggest is find out when your friend has some quiet time in the afternoons and evenings during her recovery and call her. A reminder that the world is still out there beyond her immediate situation could be a very refreshing thing.

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

Thanks for the thoughts. I think finding the right time for phone calls is a good idea, that and I will send some fun e-cards and maybe a care package to her. Thanks for letting me vent a bit.

Santa Fe, NM

Gloria, I just love your way of putting things and your cantankerous, loner character! I can relate, totally. There is nothing more disturbing than to be waking up with people praying over you and meeting strangers in your night gown. Unless they have just dragged you from a burning building. Brenda, your friend will love hearing from you but would probably appreciate a visit more when she feels better. I was with my best friend while she was going through radiation treatments for breast cancer, but not for her surgery. She got tired pretty easily but was still trying to be entertaining. Just her nature. We actually had a lot of fun under the circumstances. My M.I.L. had major heart surgery a few years ago. When she was in the hospital after surgery, the whole family was gathered 'round her bed. She looked at us, smiled, and said, " I love you all. Now, go away! " Just like her, and so funny!

Calgary, AB(Zone 3a)

O Brenda it is very hard to be long distance sometimes, isn't it? I am a very private person and very grumpy when I have dropsy. I would probably bark at anyone who visited me in the hospital. A phone call and/or a luvly cup of tea in the garden while convalescing would be my choice.

Greensboro, AL

bsavage. I hope your friend goes through the surgery with no hitches. Even if all goes well there is still the wires and ugly scars and DRAIN TUBES. Actually my home health nurse had had the same surgery back in the 70s. She had a great sense of humor and laughing really helps. She said back then the drain tube was as big as a radiator hose! Something great to wear is good also because all you have are hospital gowns.

I had a plush robe with pink and red hearts all over it - the doctor who did the surgery was fascinated with it since he does the heart surgeries every day. And you need a lot of socks because you are up and walking twice a day.

Dolores, CO(Zone 5b)

Thank you all... you are probably right about having too many visitors right after the surgery. I love the idea of the bathrobe... I am going to send her one, then she can feel like I'm giving her a hug when she wears it!

Greensboro, AL

Im sure she will love it. And any news from beyond the recovery room routine is a ray of hope and reminder that the world is still there.

Gastonia, NC(Zone 7b)

Hey, Brenda, your friend is lucky to have you as a friend. I feel very confident and trustful that, after 27 years of being close to her, you will know exactly how to be there for her, and when. The bathrobe does sound like a lovely idea!

Sending healing wishes to both of you....... it is a big deal, this kind of surgery, and I know she is already taking strength from your friendship.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

I do like the idea of phone calls at a convenient time of day and a big comfy bath robe and maybe some slippers. They get heart patients up and make them walk around quite a lot so after she gets home maybe a jogging suit. And when things calm down and you have refilled the coffers, go visit her and walk with her each day. It really helps to have a walking pal.
I wouldn't like a bunch of strange people in my hospital room praying over me either. I don't mind if people pray for me at home on their own, but I wouldn't want to have a prayer meeting in my hotel room. As much as many people believe in the power of prayer and as much as I respect that, that doesn't mean I want it going on in my presence -- especially if I am sick.

Santa Fe, NM

Too many people in a room can make anyone uncomfortable which is why many hospitals limit the number of visitors. Sometimes it is difficult to visit very old or very sick people because you really have to be aware of how tired they are. What happens sometimes is that the visitors all start talking to each other and the patient or person recovering at home gets ignored!

Denver, CO(Zone 5b)

bsavage: sorry to hear about your friend. I've had 2 friends, both under 40, undergo open heart surgery in the last 6 months. One had to have a valve repaired, the other, very healthy and fit, had to have a quintuple bypass due to severe blockage (90 - 100%). Fortunately, neither one had had a heart attack yet and both are recovering quickly from surgery.

Los Alamos, NM(Zone 5a)

That is all very scary to people my age ( 64). I worry about heart problems. I try to exercise, but lately haven't been doing much due to other physical problems. I really watch my diet eating almost no meat or dairy products. I still worry. My MIL had valve replacement and it was really hard to recover from. Bypass is much easier but has a tendency to get blocked again in a very short time. I find this all really scary.
We just don't eat and work in a way that is good for our bodies and I can vouch for the fact that changing is tough! Eating health makes it almost impossible to go to restaurants other than Asian ones and you have to learn an entire new set of recipes for foods you thought you would never eat.

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