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Plant NameCultivarTypeThumbnail
Achillea
Achillea

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Moonshine
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#1
4/2007
Mayo's
$5.00
#2
3/2008
Mayo's
$5.00
#3
4/2009
Farm Fresh Produce
$4.00
#4
5/23/2009
Walmart
$6.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
18x24 - FS - MS to EF - Brt Yellow - DH
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back fence - back corner
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#1
4/2007 planted
4/2007 already blooming
4/2008 new growth by
5/2008 blooms appeared
4/2009 new growth by
5/2009 blooms appeared
#2
3/2008 planted
5/5/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
5/2009 blooms appeared
#3
4/2009 planted
4/2009 blooms appeared
#4
5/23/2009 planted
5/23/2009 already blooming
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Best grown in lean, dry to medium moisture, well-drained sandy loams in full sun. Does well in average garden soils and tolerates poor soils as long as drainage is good. Avoid heavy clays and moist, rich, fertile soils. Plants are best sited in locations protected from strong winds. May need staking or other support. Deadhead spent flower heads to lateral buds to promote additional bloom. Cut plants back to basal leaves after flowering to tidy the planting and to encourage new foliage growth with a possible additional fall bloom 'Moonshine' is susceptible to a number of foliar diseases and tends to melt out by mid to late summer in hot and humid southern climates. Divide clumps as needed to reinvigorate plantings. 'Moonshine' is an upright, clump-forming, compact hybrid yarrow which is noted for its deeply-dissected, fern-like, aromatic, silvery to gray-green foliage and its tiny, long-lasting, bright lemon-yellow flowers which appear in dense, flattened, compound corymbs (to 2-3" across) throughout the summer on stiff, erect stems typically rising 1-2' tall. This plant resembles A'Coronation Gold' except it is much smaller and the flowers are a lighter yellow.Problems: Botrytis, stem rot, root rot, powdery mildew and rust can be significant disease problems. Plant foliage tends to decline considerably by mid summer in hot and humid summer climates. May not need staking if given proper culture, though strong summer rain storms with high winds can flatten exposed plantings. Uses: Specimen, group or mass, Borders, Cottage gardens.
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'Moonshine' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea

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4/28/2008
Home Depot
$5.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
36x24 - FS - Pink, Pale Pink - LS to EF
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back corner
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4/29/2008 planted
5/20/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
6/12/2009 blooms appeared
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Medium 28" x 14" - A strong grower with vibrant pink heads that mature to rose-pink, then slowly fade to pastel. Deep green ferny foliage. Flowers from summer to early fall. Irresistible to butterflies. Excellent fresh cut flowers or dried. Tolerant of drought, wind and heat. Grows well in almost any soil type. Spreads to fill in, so give them room. Remove spent blossoms to promote continuous flowering. Plants can be cleaned up spring or fall. Leave any fresh fall foliage to overwinter. Likes a well drained soil. Divide in spring or fall every 4-5 years.
'Oertel's Rose' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea

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4/28/2008
Home Depot
$5.00
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back garden
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4/29/2008 planted
12/2008 blooms appeared this year
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ACHILLEA TERRA COTTA Tall 36" x 36" - Delightful silvery frosted foliage sports a peach colored flower which deepens to a rich burnt orange. Achillea hybrids flower from summer to early fall. Irresistible to butterflies. Excellent fresh cut flowers or dried. Tolerant of drought, wind and heat. Grows well in almost any soil type. Spreads to fill in, so give them room. Remove spent blossoms to promote continuous flowering. Plants can be cleaned up spring or fall. Leave any fresh fall foliage to overwinter. Likes a well drained soil. Divide in spring or fall every 4-5 years
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'Terracotta' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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4/28/2008
Home Depot
2 plants for $10.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
Pink, Pale Pink
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#1 side fence - #2 back corner
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#1
4/28/2008 planted
5/18/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
5/2009 blooms appeared
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#2
4/28/2008 planted
5/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
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Beautiful rosey pink flowers that fade to soft pink. Sturdy plant with dark green feathery leaves. Wonderful addition to rock gardens and perennial borders, also perfect in a butterfly garden. Reliable drought tolerant plant for sunny location. Thrives in average to poor soil.
'Appleblossom' Plants Image
(georgewms)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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4/2009
Farm Fresh Produce
1 plant $5.00
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back corner
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Apricot, Orange, Tangerine, Pinkish Peach
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4/2009 planted
4/2009 blooms appeared
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Gorgeous new introduction. Multiple shades of apricot, tangerine, pinky-peach. All colours will be evident on a mature plant -- at the same time! Stunning when mass planted. Very compact -- only 12-13" tall, spreading to about 22-24". Undemanding perennial that blooms for a very long time starting in mid-summer. Lovely dark green, ferny foliage. Very ECO-FRIENDLY. Wonderful for attracting butterflies. Easy to grow in full sun and average soil. Drought tolerant. Low maintenance. (13")
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'Apricot Delight' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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4/2009
Farm Fresh Produce
$5.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
Pink, Pale Pink, Rose/Mauve
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back fence
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4/2009 planted
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The Tutti Frutti™ Series of Yarrows were recently bred in the Netherlands. Plants are compact and bushy, with very uniform blooming over a long season. This selection has clusters of flowers that begin dusty rose-pink, ageing to a soft creamy pink. Excellent for cutting. One of the best Yarrows for growing in containers. Deadheading faded blooms should encourage more buds to form over a long season. Likely to prove hardy down to Zone 3 or colder. A Blooms of Bressingham introduction. USPPP: unlicensed propagation prohibited. Registered with COPF.
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'Pink Grapefruit' Plants Image
(georgewms)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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4/2009
Farm Fresh Produce
1 plant for $5.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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front
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4/2009 planted
6/1/2009 blooms appeared
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The Tutti Frutti™ Series of Yarrows were recently bred in the Netherlands. Plants are compact and bushy, with very uniform blooming over a long season. This selection has clusters of flowers that rich pomegranate red, holding the colour well. Excellent for cutting. One of the best Yarrows for growing in containers. Deadheading faded blooms should encourage more buds to form over a long season. Likely to prove hardy down to Zone 3 or colder. A Blooms of Bressingham introduction. USPPP: unlicensed propagation prohibited
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'Pomegranate' Plants Image
(georgewms)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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6/3/2008
Bearden Garden Center
$7.00
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back corner
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6/7/2008 planted
12/2008 no blooms this year
3/2009 new growth
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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Medium 18" x 14" Green ferny foliage is topped by red flowers from the summer to fall. Grows well in almost any soil type. Spreads rapidly. Flowers from summer to early fall. Irresistible to butterflies. Excellent fresh cut flowers or dried. Tolerant of drought, wind and heat. Grows well in almost any soil type. Spreads to fill in, so give them room. Remove spent blossoms to promote continuous flowering. Plants can be cleaned up spring or fall. Leave any fresh fall foliage to overwinter. Likes a well drained soil. Divide in spring or fall every 4-5 years.
'Red Beauty' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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9/2007
Home Depot
$5.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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back corner
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9/2007 planted
2/27/2008 new growth
6/9/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
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A gorgeous summer flowering perennial with aromatic, ferny foliage and large, deep rose-red blooms with a tiny yellow eye. Fade resistant. Excellent new form. Great butterfly plant or cut flower. Drought tolerant. Easy to grow in full sun and average soil. (2')
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'Red Velvet' Plants Image
(georgewms)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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4/28/2008
Home Depot
$5.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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back corner
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4/29/2008 planted
5/20/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
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Achillea 'Salmon Beauty' (Salmon Yarrow) - This perennial yarrow forms a spreading mat to 3+ feet wide of fern-like, mid-green leaves. The large flat heads, rising 18 inches above the foliage have salmon pink flowers that fade to creamy yellow beginning in late spring and continuing through summer. Plant in full sun to light shade and irrigate regularly. Can withstand summer drought but looks much better when irrigated and grown in full sun. Hardy to at least 0 degrees F. 'Salmon Beauty' is sometimes called 'Lachsshonheit', the German name under which is was first named. This is one of the Galaxy Hybrids, a group of hybrids imported from Germany that resulted in crossing Achillea millefolium (pink and red flowered forms) and A. 'Taygetea'. Most of the series vegetatively resemble A. millefolium with mats of pale to dark green, dissected leaves but the larger heads of flowers come from A.'Taygetea'. Good nectar source for butterflies. This plant received the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit in 1999. The description above is based on our research and observations of this plant growing in our nursery and in our own and other Santa Barbara gardens. We would appreciate hearing from anyone who has additional information or disagrees with what we have written.
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'Salmon Beauty' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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6/13/2009
Home Depot
$5.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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front
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6/15/2009 planted
6/15/2009 already blooming
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Yarrow - Large corymbs of tiny, velvety red florets with bright gold centers. Chosen for a sturdy, compact growth habit and long bloom period as well as the fabulous bloom color. - A new cultivar of Achillea millefolium, ‘Strawberry Seduction’, characterized by it long blooming habit, its vigorous growth habit, its dense dark green foliage held on sturdy stems, and its red flowers that are consistent in color and resistant to fading.
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'Strawberry Seduction' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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5/2008
Sutherland Market
$4.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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back garden
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5/2008 planted
12/2008 no blooms this year
3/2009 new growth
6/15/2009 blooms appeared
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A massed planting will provide a variety of pastel flower shades, including pink, red, white, yellow, salmon, orange and mauve. Tiny flowers are densely packed in large, flat-topped, terminal flower clusters (corymbs) which are 2 to 3" across. Green leaves are deeply-cut, fern-like and aromatic when crushed. Tolerant of heat and humidity, but flower colors may fade in extended, hot summer weather. Drought tolerant once established. Long summer bloom period may be extended by prompt removal of faded flower heads. 1990 AAS winner.
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'Summer Pastels' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea millefolium

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4/2008
Home Depot
$6.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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back corner
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4/2008 planted
12/2008 no blooms this year
3/2009 new growth
6/14/2009 blooms appeared
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Intoxicating burgundy-red flowers, fading to pink more harmoniously than most dark Achilleas, make a startling combination with buttercup yellow Coreopsis 'Crème Brûlée' or a more restful grouping with silver Artemisia 'Silver Mound'. Spreads well, but not aggressively. These valuable garden plants from the North Temperate Zone are widely grown for the masses of flowers they bear throughout much of the summer. Their flattened flower heads introduce a fresh shape into the perennial border. Yarrows thrive in full sun and well-drained soil, and are drought tolerant. They flower from June to September. The best new varieties bloom longer and harder than their predecessors, making a good genus even more valuable. Yarrows also make excellent cut flowers for both fresh and dried arrangements.
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'Summer Wine' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Achillea
Achillea tomentosa

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4/2009
Farm Fresh Produce
$3.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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back fence
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4/2009 planted
5/4/2009 blooms appeared
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Slow Growing Yarrow for trough, container or small rock garden
Tufts of silvery green foliage and many white flowers in late spring and summer. 6” x 12” Sun to part shade, very well-drained soil. Slow growing. Hardy to -20F
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'King Edward' Plants Image
(georgewms)
Agastache
Agastache foeniculum

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6/28/2008
Lowe's
$3.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
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back fence
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6/28/2008 planted
6/28/2008 already blooming
3/2009 new growth
4/2009 moved to back fence
6/15/2009 blooms appeared
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Agastache foeniculum 'Golden Jubilee' is the recipient of the 2003 Quality Award in the Fleuroselect trials across Europe, & the All-American Selections Gold Medal when trialed that same year across the USA. For the ASS award it scored the highest ranking for length of bloom time & ease of growth. The name 'Golden Jubilee' commemorates the 50-year reign of Queen Elizabeth II. It was the very first golden-leafed agastache, bred by K. Sahin Zaden in Holland. By late June, small bluish purple flowers top twenty-inch tall spikes, over an upright compact clump of foliage, golden to chartreuse at top, lime green toward the bottom, & these very long-lasting blooms slowly increase in length in weeks to follow. The first photo shows a typical blossom as it appears in late June or early July. The second photo shows the gorgeous foliage in May before it blooms. The third photo shows the flowers in mid July, when they have swollen considerably. The fourth photo shows the impressively lengthened flower in late-July & August, at three our four inches length. The regular wild form grows as tall as four feet, but the golden variety will likely remain well under three feet. The flowers easily last from June to October in our zone. When the flowers are finally done-for in autumn, the leaves will be getting scruffy, & can be cut back. It is liked by hummingbirds & butterflies, is extremely hardy to zone 6, or with protection to zone 4. The species is native of the United states, growing from Washington state to New England all along both sides of the Canadian borders, & down into the American Southwest. It is cold-hardy in dry sunny locations, & far more humidity-tolerant than the majority of hyssops. It's so adaptable because it grows naturally both in dry harsh thickets but also in prairie conditions that are seasonally spring-wet & summer-dry, in a variety of soil conditions from acid to slightly alkaline. It is good for a xeriscape garden, but the golden coloration is best with light to moderate watering in well-drained soil. It's also a fine container plant, tolerating considerable neglect. Hermaphroditic flowers are self-fertile. Seeds ripen in autumn. First year plants started in autumn coldframes or indoors in trays & put into the garden in spring will bloom by August, but in years after it will bloom beginning late June or July. If deadheaded before the summer flowers go to seed it will bloom all the way to October or first frost. If permitted to go to seed, finches will visit the flowerheads to eat the seeds. A useful herb, the highly aromatic leaves can be used for tea that tastes of licoricy mint, or dried for poupouri. Young leaves are tasty raw in salads or fresh fruit-cups; tougher older leaves can be added to cooked foods. Extracted oils have been used in food flavorings. Chinese herbalists believe it is useful for heart conditions, though there are no well-designed double-blind studies to lend credence to this traditional use. It may more certainly help relieve cold symptoms, as its mildly antiviral properties appear to be legitimate.
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'Golden Jubilee' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Ajuga
Ajuga reptans

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4/2008
The Flower Market
$7.00
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back fence
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4/2008 planted
12/2008 no blooms this year
4/2009 new growth by
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Ajuga reptans 'Catlin's Giant' (Catlin's Carpet Bugle) - A very hardy groundcover that quickly spreads to make a lustrous mat of green leaves with bronze tinge. In the spring, blue-purple flower spikes rise above the foliage. It prefers to grow in cool sun or part shade, with regular watering. Grows to about 1' x 3'. Hardy to well below 0 degrees F. The plant we grew for many years (since 1995) as 'Catlin's Giant' is not what is currently being grown under this name by most nurseries. We have switched to growing the commonly accepted form with smaller more bronze leaves and continue to grow the larger green leafed plant we listed for many years under this name as Ajuga reptans 'Jungle Beauty'. The description above is based on our research and observations of this plant growing in our nursery and in our own and other Santa Barbara gardens. We would appreciate hearing from anyone who has additional information or disagrees with what we have written. - This variety tends to be a clumper until it gets established. At that time, it will spread to form a dense, weed-smothering groundcover. 'Catlin's Giant' is an outstanding evergreen groundcover that has attractive, colorful foliage that looks nice all year. Blue flower spikes in spring. It can grow in the shade of large trees where grass is hard to establish. It also fits nicely into rock gardens and mixed container plantings. Unlike many perennials that are grown only for their flowers, ajuga is prized for its attractive, colorful foliage that looks nice all year.
Ajuga grows best in partial to full shade but will also grow in full sun if constant moisture is provided. It will tolerate any soil, even poor ones, as long as it is well drained. Good air circulation is essential to avoid crown rot. This species grows quickly and should therefore be planted in areas where a mass of groundcover is desired such as on a slope or under a tree. Do not use it as an edging for the lawn; it will easily spread into the grass.
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'Catlin's Giant' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Alcea
Alcea rosea

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Chater's Double Red
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4/2009
Mayo's
$5.00
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Bienniel - 72 x 18 - FS - MS to EF
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back fence
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planted 4/2009
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The best red returns! Ruffled fully double blooms in a rich scarlet blooming from the bottom to the top of the stalk. - Hollyhock 'Chater's Double Red' (Alcea rosea) :Plants overwinter as perennials in zones 3-9. Big, gracious 4-inch double or semidouble red blooms begin low on the stalk, for even more color on every plant! In bright shades of red, these big semi- to fully-double flowers arise all along tall, sturdy stalks beginning just 4 months from sowing! Hollyhock, Chater's Double Red is a long-blooming, very colorful series so garden-worthy that it received an AAS award! Tall and stately, it blooms all summer for a rich display of big powderpuff blossoms! The 4-inch blooms are richly hued, and will not fade in the summer sun. Superb for cutting, they open from the bottom of the stalk upwards, keeping you in fresh blooms for weeks on end! And this stunning series sets its blooms even lower on the stalk than most Hollyhocks, for a little more color on every stalk! Easy to grow in full sun and almost any well-drained soil.::Hardiness Zone: 3-9
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'Chater's Double Rose' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Allium Species
Allium aflatunense

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- Persian Blue -
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11/2008
CVS Pharmacy
3 bulbs for $5.00
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Container
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3/2009 planted bulbs in container on 2 of them
3/2009 new growth
4/2009 blooms appeared on those two
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Imposing blooms come highly recommended by our Hillegom garden experts. Perfect spheres are actually hundreds of clustered, star-shaped, purple-blue florets. They create a dazzling effect as they appear to rise almost overnight. The tall allium stems combine beautifully with low-growing hostas and other perennials.
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Plants, Roots, Tubers and Bulbs Image
(georgewms)
Allium
Allium aflatunense

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#1
10/2007
Home Depot
8 bulbs for $3.00
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#2
11/2008
CVS Pharmacy
8 bulbs for $5.00
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back garden
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#1
10/2007 planted
5/3/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
#2
3/2009 planted in container
3/2009 new growth
5/2/2009 blooms appeared
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ALLIUM aflatunense Purple Sensation - Ornamental Onion - 24-36" tall. Hundreds of violet purple tiny flowers compressed to gorgeous round balls in late spring. Deer resistant. Great for cutting. Plant all varieties of Allium in rich, well-drained soil in full sun in early fall. The smaller varieties of Allium should be planted 8" deep and the larger varieties 7-8" deep. Many are suitable for dried flowers, pest repellent. Spacing 8". Do not plant too closely together since they multiply rapidly. Water well throughout the growing season.
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'Purple Sensation' Plants, Roots, Tubers and Bulbs Image
(PlantFiles)
Allium Species
Allium bulgaricum

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October 2007
Home Depot
15 bulbs $5.00
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back garden
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10/2007 planted
4/25/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 possible new growth
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plant away from house as it has a strong garlic smell
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This spring I watched an unassuming clump of leaves grow and produce a really tall stem in our yard. The previous owners of our house had planted garlic in one of our raised beds, and I thought this was another one. But then the stem got so tall that I knew it couldn’t be. It spooked me a little, since it developed twisted leaves, and I kept my distance from it in case pods opened and showered me with spores to take over my body. And then, about the third week of May, the thing from outer space flowered. It had a cluster of nodding blooms that were dark pinkish-red and white-striped, on top of a 3 ½-foot stem. The base of the flower was clear apple green, so the look was very exotic and intriguing.
My partner Mark did some searching and discovered it was Sicilian honey lily, Nectaroscordum siculum subsp. bulgaricum. (You Latin-name fans might also see it classified as Allium bulgaricum or Allium siculum.) It’s pretty unique; at least I’d never seen it before. I found out that the bulbs are easy to grow. They’re hardy in zones 4-8 and like well-drained soil and full sun. They flower in late spring. Plant your bulbs in fall, and enjoy this blooming conversation piece come spring. If you want to plant your own, fall is the time to do it. Plant the bulbs 4 inches deep and 3-4 inches apart. They bloom about the same time as Dutch iris, other ornamental alliums and late daffodils. Because Sicilian honey lily is so tall, you can plant other bulbs under it, or use annuals like sweet alyssum. Or try growing the bulb with low-growing perennials like creeping veronica (Veronica peduncularis ‘Georgia Blue’). Sicilian honey lily isn’t for everybody, so make sure it’s something you think you’d like in your garden. We love it because it’s so distinctive. I was lucky enough to find bulbs at a local store, so next year we’ll have lots more popping up. (And this time, I’ll be ready for them.)
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Plants, Roots, Tubers and Bulbs Image
(PlantFiles)
Allium Species
Allium sphaerocephalon

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11/2008
CVS Pharmacy
12 bulbs for $5.00
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Container
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3/2009 planted bulbs
3/2009 new growth
6/20/2009 blooms appeared
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The drumstick allium has egg-shaped flowers in summer that start off green, then bloom and develop to pink and then clover red-purple. These plants are attractive in a bed or border, especially peeking up through other plants, such as roses, so that their nondescript foliage is hidden. Their vertical presence and eye-catching flower shape are valuable additions to the garden, and they naturalize freely. The charming purple-red drumsticks bloom in midsummer and then fade as summer wears on. Plant 2 to 4 inches deep in fertile, well-drained soil in full sun in autumn.
Propagation: From seed, sow in containers in a cold frame when ripe or in spring. Some Allium take two years to germinate. Remove offsets in fall. Problems: Bulb rots in damp conditions. White rot, mildew, rust, smut, and various fungal leaf spots can occur. Onion fly and thrips are also possibilities.
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Roots, Tubers and Bulbs Image
(PlantFiles)
Aloysia Species
Aloysia triphylla

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6/3/2008
Pope's
$6.00
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back corner
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6/7/2008 planted
12/2008 no blooms this year
4/20/2009 new growth
6/10/2009 stepped on plant and it broke even with the ground
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It has a woody trunk and branches with tender stems holding long pointed leaves. Produces small, pale mauve flowers from summer to autumn. Leaves have a strong lemon fragrance and flavour. CULINARY: The leaves and flowering tops are used in teas and to flavour alcoholic beverages. The plant is also an ingredient in some desserts, fruit salads and jams. Leaves are great for tea.- Native to Argentina and Chile, lemon verbena is a woody shrub that produces shiny lanceolate green leaves (to 3-4” long) that have a strong aroma (without crushing) and taste of lemon. Leaves are opposite or in whorls of three (hence the specific epithet). Plants will grow to 10-15’ tall in the tropics, but to 2-4’ tall in containers. Fragrant, white to pale lilac flowers bloom from mid-summer to early fall, but have little ornamental significance. Container plants may not bloom. Plants are evergreen in tropical/warm winter locations but deciduous in areas where freezing temperatures occur. Lemon verbena has been a popular garden plant in warm southern and western parts of the U. S. for many years. Leaves are strongest at the time of flowering. Leaves and flowers are used for culinary purposes (teas, desserts, fruit salads and jams) for perfumes and cosmetics, for potpourris and as herbal medicines (colds, fevers, dyspepsia and diarrhea). Aloysia triphylla is synonymous with Aloysia citriodora, Lippia citriodora, Verbena citriodora and Verbena triphylla. Spanish explorers brought this plant to Spain in the 17th century at which point it was named after Princess Louisa of Parma (genus name is a version of Louisa and common name is Herb Louisa).
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Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Alstroemeria Species
Alstroemeria psittacina

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4/30/2009
Stanley's Greenhouse
$9.00
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Reseeds very easily
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back corner
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5/1/2009 planted
5/1/2009 already blooming
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The Parrot Lily (Alstroemeria psittacina) is a gorgeous tropical from Brazil with exotic, feathery blooms reminiscent of parrots! The trumpet-shaped flowers demand attention, with their unusual combination of crimson and light green. This easy-to-grow Lily relative adds a tropical touch to any garden, even if grown in a pot. The blooms make excellent cut flowers, often lasting 2 weeks in a vase. Hummingbirds love this plant as much as people do! The Parrot Lily is a tuberous perennial with lush, green foliage about 12-18" tall. From late spring through fall, 2- to 3-foot tall flower stalks appear, each topped with about 5 to 9 flowers in a radial pattern. The species name psittacina is Latin for "parrot". The plants multiply through offsets, and they also spread easily by seed. A border or bed of Parrot Lilies is an impressive sight, but even a single plant in a pot is quite a treat! The Parrot Lily is easy to grow. The tubers are hardy to Zone 7 or 8, depending on how deep they're planted. In colder areas, simply grow it in a pot and bring it indoors in the winter. It enjoys sun, however in warmer areas like Florida and Texas, it will do best in filtered afternoon sun. It spreads readily, and in fact can become invasive in warmer climates, so be careful where you plant it. Here in mild San Francisco, it can bloom all the way into winter. - Please note that this plant is known to be invasive, since it spreads easily by seeds, and also by offsets. You may snip off the flower heads after blooming to prevent seeds from forming, however a large bed of them will probably get out of control. For this reason you may wish to grow only a few of them. Use Roundup if the plant should become invasive. - Fertilizing - During periods of active growth, feed every 3-4 weeks with ordinary fertilizer that contains micronutrients. Follow the label's recommended dosage carefully. It's normal for some of the older leaves to turn yellow and drop throughout the year, but if it's excessive, it could be from not enough fertilizer, particularly nitrogen. It could also be from inconsistent watering.
Bugs to watch for -- Aphids (green ones are hard to see), caterpillars, slugs & snails.
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Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Amsonia
Amsonia tabernaemontana

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6/2009
Lowe's
$3.00
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front
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Perennial of the Year 2008
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6/13/2009 planted
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Bluestars are prized because they make outstanding drought-tolerant garden plants and because they bear one of the few true-blue flowers of any perennial. Not only are the species themselves superb, but many newer hybrids are destined to become garden staples. One of the best cultivars -- if not the best -- is Amsonia ‘Blue Ice,’ which produces a low, tidy mound of small, willowlike dark-green leaves that turn bright yellow in fall. In late spring, clusters of star-shaped, dark lavender-blue blossoms adorn the foliage. The species is native to eastern North America. The Wisconsin Nursery Association’s Plant of the Year Program is honoring ‘Blue Ice’ as its Perennial of the Year in 2008. The program’s aim is to promote quality and underused plants to the public. Questionable parentage This long-blooming, compact amsonia was discovered in a seedling block of A. tabernaemontana at White Flower Farm in Litchfield, Conn. It is possibly a hybrid with the taxonomically challenged A. montana. Whatever its parentage, ‘Blue Ice’ flowers longer and stronger than the species. ‘Blue Ice’ is a significantly heavier bloomer, sporting deeper blue flowers. Use amsonia in borders, rock gardens, cottage gardens or open woodland areas. It’s best when massed. The plant’s compact size also enables it to be used as an edging plant. ‘Blue Ice’ is very easy to grow and hardy and drought tolerant once established. ‘Blue Ice’ grows best in dry to average, well-drained soil in full sun to partial shade, and can grow to 12-18 inches tall. Plants are adaptable to most conditions; however, if it is too shady they may topple over.
‘Blue Ice’ thrives in USDA Hardiness Zones 4-9. The best fall foliage color usually occurs in full sun, but flowers generally last longer if given some afternoon shade in hot sun areas. This compact cultivar does not need to be cut back after flowering and generally requires no staking or support. ‘Blue Ice’ looks fantastic in a gallon. There are no known serious insect or disease problems.
'Blue Ice' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Anemone
Anemone

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11/2007
Pope's
$12.00
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back garden
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11/2007 planted
4/2008 new growth
12/2008 bloomed this year
3/2009 new growth
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Japanese Anemone
Produces masses of large, pure white, semi-double blooms later in the season. This is a taller form growing 3-4' tall. Good for cutting.
Japanese Anemone are outstanding perennials for the late summer and fall garden. Slow to establish they will however spread to create a large patch. Carefree and low maintenance, they generally perform best in part shade and moist soil, although I have found they also do quite well in full sun and dryish soil.
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'Whirlwind' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia

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4/2009
Farm Fresh Produce
2 plants for $10.00
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Deadhead ASAP for Reblooming
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back garden
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4/2009 already blooming
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A dwarf form of Colombine in a great range of colours. 'Granny's Bonnet' flowers, appear well above the foliage, in early summer. 45cm in height with a spread of 40cm. Easy to grow and may well seed itself in future seasons but the resulting flower colours may not be as strong. Plant in sun or partial shade. These plants will thrive in most soils if not too wet. - This variety is an excellent compact plant featuring a lovely mixture of densely clustered pastel flowers. The finely textured foliage forms graceful, airy clumps. A wonderful choice for border and rock gardens, or as cut flowers.
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'Biedermeier Group' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia

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#1 - 4/2008
Walmart
6 roots $5.00
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#2 - 4/2009
Stanley's Greenhouse
$9.00
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back garden
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#1 - 4/2008 planted
#1 - 4/2008 new growth
#1 - 3/2009 new growth
#1 - 3/2009 blooms appeared
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#2 - 4/2009 planted
#2 - 4/2009 already blooming
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Easily grown in average, medium, well-drained soil in full sun to part shade. Tolerates wide range of soils except heavy, poorly drained ones. Prefers rich, moist soils with light to moderate shade. Remove flowering stems after bloom to encourage additional bloom. Keep soils uniformly moist after bloom to prolong attractive foliage appearance. When foliage depreciates, plants may be cut to the ground. This cultivar may be grown from seed and may self-seed in the garden under optimum growing conditions. However, different varieties of columbine may cross-pollinate in the garden producing seed that is at variance with either or both parents. - The McKana Group is a tall columbine hybrid seed strain which features a wide selection of large, bright-colored, long-spurred, nodding, bi-colored flowers in shades of blue/white, red/yellow and various other color combinations involving pinks and purples. A clump-forming perennial which typically grows to 30" tall. Biternate to triternate, almost fern-like, gray-green foliage is somewhat suggestive of meadow rue (Thalictrum). Blooms in spring. Aquilegia comes from the Latin word for eagle in reference to the flower's five spurs which purportedly resemble an eagle's talon.
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'McKana's Giant' Plants, Roots, Tubers and Bulbs Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia flabellata

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4/2009
Lowe's
6 plants for $12.00
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back garden
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4/2009 already blooming
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Bright violet flowers with white spurs flower on short, compact foliage. Flowers attract hummingbirds. Excellent in borders or as a shady rock garden naturalizer. - Promising plenty of nodding vivid blue-violet flowers brightened by white centers, this sturdy Columbine forms a tidy, low growing mound of deep green foliage. Nestled along a stone wall or garden path, ‘Blue Angel’ will bestow enchanting detail. Blooms April to early June. 8" x 10"
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'Blue Angel' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia flabellata var. pumila

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4/2009
Lowe's
2 plants for $4.00
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back garden
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4/2009 already blooming
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White-flowering Aquilegia flabellata var. pumilla is sometimes offered as 'Pumila Alba.' The dwarf form is called 'Nana Alba,' or White Dwarf. This Asian species forms a six or eight inch tall clump of fat deeply cut leaves, occasionally clumping to a full foot. The glaucus blue-green or grey-green leaves evoke the common name "Japanese Fan Columbine," the leaves evoking a geisha's fan. It is extremely hardy & can be grown even so far north as USDA zone two, or three to eight more certainly. Not terribly heat hardy, it won't tolerate full sun in zone nine, but does prefer full sun in the north. We planted it at the part shade/part sun margin of a garden underneath the paperbark maple amidst other very small ground-covering bright-shade flowers of about the same height, including wood anemones & anemonellas & a bit further into the shade, hepaticas, all having low growth habit & gorgeous flowers & leaves. The nodding flowers of the dwarf Japanese Fan Columbine are pure white with a waxy sheen. The mid-April photo at top shows the handsome leaves & fat buds which will open into roundish spurred flowers by month's end. The second photo shows it in May flower. Blooms persist through the majority of summer, taking over for when the wood anemones & amenonellas are going into summer dormance. It may die out of the garden after a few years unless permitted to self-seed.
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'Alba' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia vulgaris

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4/2008
Home Depot
6 bulbs $5.00
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back garden
-
3/2009 new growth
4/2009 blooms appeared
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A new generation of columbines. In keeping with our on-going endeavors to bring you the very best of the world's greatest plant introductions, we have the pleasure of featuring Aquilegia Clementine, an exciting new series of columbines. The Clementine Series is the culmination of years of intensive breeding and carefully dedicated hybridizing, resulting in an awarding winning series and completely new generation of columbines, or Granny's bonnets, as they are sometimes called.
Gone are the days of the tall, lanky columbines that leaned out from the back of beds to display their downward facing flowers. In the Clementine series, we have short, bushy, compact plants with masses of double and semi-double, upward facing flowers. Nice as the old style ones are, this is a breeding breakthrough that has real "flower power": a compact, "no need to stake" habit; and a range of colors allowing us to give our gardens a lively burst of refreshing vibrancy, at a time of year when the weather conditions can be unpredictable. Flowers resemble Miniature Clematis. Just one look and you can't help but notice the resemblance to double flowered clematis. They also remind me of miniature versions of those big, handsome, dahlia blooms that grace our yards in late summer; or those huge waterlily flowers that you see floating on the surface of a pond. Each flower is composed of many petals, presented in such profusion and so prominently, that at times they almost hide the prettily divided, blue-green, clover-shaped leaves. The attractive foliage forms a skirt close to the earth. Then, sprouting up through and above the leaves, come sturdy stems, laden with lots of flower buds. These buds nod a little at first, but as they open they turn to face upward, displaying the flowers to maximum advantage, while at the same time showing off all the poise, refinement and proportion of these carefully bred winners. Available in six colors.
They come in different colors, so you can choose from your favorite shades. Use them to build a color themed display, or group them all together to make a living kaleidoscope of color.
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'Clementine Formula Mix' Roots, Tubers and Bulbs Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia vulgaris

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4/2009
Stanley's Greenhouse
2 plants for $16.00
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back garden
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4/2009 planted
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Aquilegia 'Leprechaun Gold' variegated foliage. A columbine to brighten shady areas, Leprechaun Gold has attractive gold and green marbled leaves that make a perfect backdrop for large violet blooms which are held high above the foliage. Growig to 24 inches, this variety is hardy to zone 4 and enjoys part shade and moist, well drained soil.
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'Leprechaun Gold' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia vulgaris

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3/2009
Home Depot
2 plants $10.00
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back garden
-
3/2009 planted
3/2009 already blooming
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This hybrid columbine has large rose and white flowers. It blooms more heavily for longer than others and will even flower in the first year from seed. In spring it puts forth open mounds of three parted, soft green, lobed leaves. By late spring to early summer it bears erect stems of upward facing or nodding large spurred flowers with broad rose-colored outer petals and white spurred inner petals. A flush of golden stamens extends from the center of each flower. Grow columbine in full sun to partial shade and fertile well-drained soil that’s evenly moist. The more sunlight the more important it is the soil has available moisture. They can be short-lived, but self-sow gently to replace themselves; though the seedlings do not come true to seed. Deadhead spent flowers immediately if you don’t want new plants to seed in. The flowers of ‘Origami Rose and White’ attract many pollinators. This deer resistant perennial is terrific for cottage or open woodland gardens and mixed flower borders. It’s even suited to container culture. Columbine flowers are pretty when cut for arrangements, though they are not long-lasting. Mix them with foamflower and small woodland Allium for a pretty early summer display.
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'Origami Rose & White' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia vulgaris

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4/2008
Mayo's
$8.00
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back garden
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4/2008 planted
4/2008 already blooming
3/2009 new growth by
3/2009 blooms appeared by
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Columbines are now available in a wide range of colours and plant heights. The midsized Swan series features large spurred blooms held on sturdy stems over lacy leaves. This variety has lavender-mauve outer petals surrounding an inner white trumpet or corolla. Excellent for cutting. Since Columbines are relatively short lived, allow some of the plants to go to seed and self sow. Leaf miners or sawfly may disfigure the leaves around flowering time. Simply trim off the ugly foliage and the plants will grow fresh leaves.
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'Swan Lavender and White' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia vulgaris

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4/2008
Mayo's
$5.00
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3/2009
Mayo's
3 plants for $15.00
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back garden > columbine + bee balm garden
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4/2008 planted
12/2008 bloomed this year
3/2009 new growth
3/2009 blooms appeared
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This is a novelty variety of columbine that produces myriads of small, double, red and white flowers on uniform, sturdy plants. The flowers are presented in a bouquet atop the nicely mounded foliage and face upward for best display. This variety works well in containers or near the front of flower borders. Aquilegia is especially lovely when allowed to naturalize in shady, woodland borders. They also have excellent potential as cut flowers, lasting up to 2 weeks in a vase. Origin: Not Native to North America
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'Winky Red and White' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Aquilegia
Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata

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7/2008
Mayo's
$3.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
FS to PS - 32" x 18" - LS to MS
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back garden
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7/2008 planted
3/2009 new growth
4/2009 blooms appeared
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double flowered, multiple petals, upfacing and flared, mixed colors, contains an incredible range of colors white, rose, violet, purple-black and many bicolors. Traditional favorite, also known as Granny’s bonnet, has double blooms that seem nestled one inside the other! Red, blue, pink, or black flowers provide twice the sparkle in borders, rock gardens and bouquets. Will delight hummingbirds and butterflies. Foliage: Gray green, distinctly lobed foliage with slender branching stems. - Flower Form: Fully double flowers, spurless, upward facing. - Flower Color: - Mix-red, pink, blue or black - Flowering Date: Early to mid summer - Planting Requirements: Prefers cool conditions in summer. Light shade prolongs the flowering season. - Soil Requirements: Grow in fertile, preferably moist but well drained soil. - Growth Rate: Moderate - Unique Characteristics: Fully double flowers in a nice mix of colors. Old time favorite perennial but in a striking double form that looks as if several blooms are set inside one another. - Pruning: Remove spent flower stems. - Time of Pruning: After flowering - Unusual columbines with fully double spurless flowers that face upward like the old stalwart A. Nora Barlow. Modern breeding has enhanced the color selection of this durable, long-time favorite to 10 distinct shades including burgundy, red, maroon, blue, pink, white, violet and almost black. Great for cutting. Ht. 12".
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'Barlow Mix' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Arenaria Species
Arenaria montana

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4/2009
Lowe's
2 plants for $10.00
-
back garden
-
4/2009 planted
4/2009 already blooming
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Mountain sandwort has a prostrate, creeping habit, with trailing stems that reach 12 in. long. It reaches 6-8 in. tall. The evergreen leaves are oval, opposite, and colored grayish-green. They reach ½-¾ in. long and are softly hairy. Flowering occurs in mid to late spring, and white flowers ¾ to 1 in. long are produced densely in cymes containing 2 to 10 flowers. Optimal growing conditions: Mountain sandwort performs best in sandy, well-drained, and moderately acidic soil. Good drainage is necessary because serious disease problems may occur in poorly drained soils. It prefers full sun or light shade. Roots are shallow, so it is susceptible to drought. Watering during summer is often necessary. Growth is moderate. Winter hardiness: Zones 4-7. Susceptibility to pests and diseases: Mountain sandwort has no serious insect problems. Concerning diseases, crown rot may be a serious disease in a poorly drained soil. Other diseases such as leaf spot, powdery mildew, and rust may occur as well. Use: Mountain sandwort is mainly used in rock gardens or in front of borders. It can easily become invasive, and many gardeners mow the flowers off before seed can ripen.
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Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Armeria
Armeria maritima

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4/2009
Lowe's
2 plants for $4.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
-
back fence + back garden
-
4/2009 planted
4/2009 already blooming
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Common name : Variegated Thrift - This British selection of Thrift is a cute treasure for the rock garden or for edging. Plants form a low grassy mound of green and white-striped leaves, bearing short stems of bright pink pompon flowers in late spring, later changing to papery seed heads. Excellent in trough gardens. Trim off faded flowers to encourage repeat blooming, if desired.
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'Nifty Thrifty' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Armeria
Armeria maritima

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4/2009
Bearden Garden Center
2 plants for $15.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
-
back fence
-
4/2009 planted
4/2009 already blooming
-
Red Leaved Thrift - Very shiny green hair-like foliage turns reddish purple tones in spring and bronze in fall. Deep pink pom-pom flowers bloom late spring to mid summer. Excellent front of the border plant.
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'Rubrifolia' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Armeria
Armeria maritima

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4/28/2008
Home Depot
$4.00
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Deadhead for Reblooming
-
back fence
-
5/1/2008 planted
5/1/2008 already blooming
3/2009 new growth
4/2009 blooms appeared
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Evergreen perennials with green foliage and globular pink flowers in spring and early summer. Tolerates poor, drained soils and does well in full sun. Plant in flowerpots, flower gardens and rock gardens. Propagated by division. Soil - Grows well in poor soil. Dry, infertile, even salty soil. Tips - Do not fertilize, except with bone meal in early spring. Too much fertilizer will lessen the number of flowers.
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'Splendens' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Armeria
Armeria pseudarmeria

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4/2009
Lowe's
2 plants for $10.00
-
Deadhead for Reblooming
-
back fence
-
4/2009 planted
4/2009 already blooming
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ARMERIA Joystick Lilac - Dwarf Sea Thrif - Short 12" - Plant 12" apart. A new series of Armerias, long lived and easy to grow, the leaves are quite substantial in basal clumps with the flower balls held above on wiry stems. Rosy lilac spheres, blooms into summer.
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'Joystick Lilac' Plants Image
(PlantFiles)
Michaelmas Daisy
Aster

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10/2007
Home Depot
$5.00
-
back garden - various locations
-
10/2007 planted
10/2007 already blooming
4/2008 new growth
10/2008 blooms appeared
3/2009 new growth
6/10/2009 blooms appeared
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A distinct cultivar of Aster plant named `Thyra Viking`, characterized by its rapid growth rate and moderate vigor; freely branching and uniform plant habit; freely flowering even under winter conditions; large daisy-type inflorescences with dark red purple ray florets and yellow centers; and good post-production longevity. - The new cultivar originated from a cross made in 1994, by the inventor of the cultivar Purple Viking as the male or pollen parent with the cultivar Royal Ruby as the female for seed parent.
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'Thyra Viking' Plants Image
(georgewms)

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