Opinion polls reveal blue to be the most popular color in this country, and it's also the favorite worldwide. Many gardeners love it and would like to have more blue blooms in their gardens. Here are some ideas for adding the Color of the Year to yours.

In December 2019, Pantone announced its 2020 Color of the Year: Classic Blue, a shade reminiscent of the sky at dusk. Adding it in your garden is relatively easy since you have the option of blue annuals, perennials, shrubs, vines, bulbs and, although scarce, even a couple of trees that produce blue blooms.

Pantone's classic blue

If you'd like to incorporate more blue into your garden or containers, consider planting these:

Butterfly Pea Vine (Clitoria terneata)

butterfly pea vine blossom
butterfly pea (Centrosema virginianum) is a trailing vine that produces pinkish-blue or violet blooms in spring and summer. As the name suggests, butterfly pea flowers are favored by butterflies, but birds and bees love them, too. Centrosema includes about 40 species around the world, but only three are native to the United States. Read on to learn more about spurred butterfly pea plants. Growing Spurred Butterfly Pea Vines Spurred butterfly pea vines are suitable for growing in USDA plant hardiness zones 10 and 11, but you can grow the vines as annuals if you live in a cooler climate. Spurred butterfly pea plants are easy to grow from seed, either by planting directly in the garden in spring, or by starting them indoors about 12 weeks ahead of time. Lightly nick or scrape the seeds, and then let them soak overnight in room temperature water before planting. Seeds generally germinate in two to three weeks. Butterfly pea flowers grow in nearly any type of soil, including nutrient-poor, but sandy, acidic soil is preferable. Good drainage is critical, as spurred butterfly pea plants won’t tolerate soggy growing conditions. Plant butterfly pea flowers where the vines have plenty of room to sprawl, or let the delicate stems climb over a trellis or fence. This is an excellent plant for any lighting condition, including full sunlight, shade, or semi-shade.

Read more at Gardening Know How: What Is A Butterfly Pea Plant: Tips On Planting Butterfly Pea Flowers https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/butterfly-pea/planting-butterfly-pea-flowers.htm
What is a butterfly pea? Also known as spurred butterfly pea vines, climbing butterfly pea, or wild blue vine, butterfly pea (Centrosema virginianum) is a trailing vine that produces pinkish-blue or violet blooms in spring and summer. As the name suggests, butterfly pea flowers are favored by butterflies, but birds and bees love them, too. Centrosema includes about 40 species around the world, but only three are native to the United States. Read on to learn more about spurred butterfly pea plants. Growing Spurred Butterfly Pea Vines Spurred butterfly pea vines are suitable for growing in USDA plant hardiness zones 10 and 11, but you can grow the vines as annuals if you live in a cooler climate. Spurred butterfly pea plants are easy to grow from seed, either by planting directly in the garden in spring, or by starting them indoors about 12 weeks ahead of time. Lightly nick or scrape the seeds, and then let them soak overnight in room temperature water before planting. Seeds generally germinate in two to three weeks. Butterfly pea flowers grow in nearly any type of soil, including nutrient-poor, but sandy, acidic soil is preferable. Good drainage is critical, as spurred butterfly pea plants won’t tolerate soggy growing conditions. Plant butterfly pea flowers where the vines have plenty of room to sprawl, or let the delicate stems climb over a trellis or fence. This is an excellent plant for any lighting condition, including full sunlight, shade, or semi-shade. Butterfly Pea Plant Care Butterfly pea plant care is definitely uninvolved and the plants require very little attention. Here are a handful of tips to ensure your spurred butterfly pea vines grow and bloom like crazy. Water the plant regularly during the first growing season, but beware of overwatering. Spurred butterfly pea vines are drought tolerant and, once established, require supplemental irrigation only during periods of hot, dry weather. Pinch growing tips regularly to encourage bushy growth and prevent legginess. No fertilizer is required.

Read more at Gardening Know How: What Is A Butterfly Pea Plant: Tips On Planting Butterfly Pea Flowers https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/butterfly-pea/planting-butterfly-pea-flowers.htm

Anemones

Perennial anemones bloom spring, summer, and fall and are among the first spring bloomers. Producing a cup-shaped bloom on long, wiry stems, they're easy to grow and very low maintenance. They also do well in containers.

blue anemones

Centaurea cyanus

blue centaurea

This annual, also called bachelor's button and cornflower, is often found in perennial wildflower seed mixes because it blooms prolifically and easily self-seeds. It does not transplant well so should be grown from seed. They're found in shades of blue, white and pink and are good for cutting and drying.

Bachelor's button prefers well-drained soil in full sun. Taller varieties require staking to prevent blowing over or being beaten down by rain.

Deadheading will encourage them to bloom continuously from early summer through the fall. They're drought-tolerant and rarely bothered by insects or diseases.

Hydrangea

blue hydrangea

Hydrangeas in bloom can be a show-stopper. Many blue hydrangeas come in vivid colors; others are subtle shades of powder or sky blue. Shades will vary due to the alkalinity of the soil.

The attractive clusters of hydrangea flowers vary from mophead to lacecap types and typically bloom from summer to fall. Depending on the variety of hydrangea, they will differ in size, flower shape, color, and bloom time.

blue hydrangea

Borage

borage blooms

The blue blooms of borage are a beautiful addition to a garden. This medicinal herb has edible flowers and leaves. Also known as starflower, bee bush, bee bread, and bugloss, some of these common names indicate the plant's reputation for attracting bees.

Borage tastes similar to cucumbers, and the plant has numerous culinary uses in soups, salads, and beverages. Try freezing some in ice cube trays to add to lemonade, iced tea or cocktails.

In the garden, borage repels pests like hornworms and is a great companion plant for tomatoes, strawberries, and squash. In many zones, it will flower from mid-spring to early fall.

Campanula

Perennial campanula, also known as bellflower, has blooms in shades of purple, blue and white. Some varieties are just 8 inches high while others can grow almost 4 feet tall. In warmer gardening zones, they may not last as long as other perennials and may totally disappear after a few years. Diseases and pests are usually not a problem. Slugs are the primary pests.

campanula blooms

Salvia

salvia blooms

Salvia is a species of flowering plants in the mint family. Perennial salvias are excellent, easy-to-grow perennials for a summer show of intense color. They perform best in full sun and are real heat lovers. Not only do the flowers attract butterflies, the plants are also very deer resistant. Also called meadow sage, salvias respond well to shearing after blooming to promote more blooms and fresh foliage.

Chionodoxa

chionodoxa blooms

Chionodoxa forbesii 'Blue Giant' is among the first bulbs to bloom in spring. Deer-resistant, compact, winter-hardy, and low-maintenance, these bulbs are excellent for naturalizing. They're striking when planted underneath trees or shrubs and even in a lawn where they will multiply easily and spread. They can also be planted in containers, flower beds, and borders.

Columbine

columbine blooms

Columbine is a unique flower with delicate petals and colored sepals that give it an appearance similar to a flock of birds. The name comes from the Latin word meaning dove. Columbine flowers are available in many colors, including blue. The plant foliage is dark bluish-green. These perennials are easy to grow and will reseed themselves in the garden each year, saving you the effort.

Delphinium

delphinium blooms

Delphiniums (larkspur) are known for their tall, beautiful blue flowers. The name comes from the Greek word delphis, meaning dolphin, which refers to the bud shape that supposedly resembles a dolphin. These flowers are one of the truest shades of blue.

If you want to add a vertical element to your garden, larkspurs are an excellent choice. There are over 300 species of this plant that can be either an annual, biennial, or perennial. The plant requires maintenance. You will need to stake, prune, deadhead and also watch for diseases. These blue bloomers prefer moist, cool summers and do not grow well in hot, dry weather.

Gentian

gentian blooms

Gentian is a North American native wildflower with true blue flowers and smooth, green, lance-shaped foliage. Its blooms are very attractive to butterflies and hummingbirds. The plant begins blooming in mid-summer and continues through the fall. It performs best in moist woodland areas and near ponds or streams.

Ceanothus

Also known as the California lilac, ceanothus is a genus of nitrogen-fixing shrubs and small trees. Other common names are buckbrush, California lilac, and soap bush. The genus is native to North America with the highest diversity found on the West Coast.

ceanothus blooms

blue blooming tree

Ipomoea

The flowers of a morning glory vine are shaped like saucers. This annual is frequently found in cottage gardens where it provides a steady display of flowers from summer into fall. Morning glories bloom during the day and die by evening. The majority of these vines have rich green leaves and are ideal for growing on trellises, arbors, and fences.

blue morning glory

blue morning glory

blue morning glory

(Pantone Classic Blue planters)