However, many of us do not even know what zone we live in. Do you know what zone you live in? You may be asking yourself “What the heck is a zone?” These zones help tell us when to plant what and where certain plants will grow best. There are 13 zones and each is separated into two subzones, A and B. These zones go by the average annual minimum winter temperature according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). For example, I live in southern Missouri where the zone is 6b. When to plant depends on what you are planting too. So, I will separate them into different sections, vegetables and flowers.

Vegetables

Different vegetables need to be planted at different times of the year, depending on what zone you live in. Also, many of them you will probably want to start from seed, growing indoors and then transplanting them outside when they are ready. You can get more detailed information on the back of the seed packets because some may be different depending on the various types.

Zones 3-5 Northern United States

-Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Peas, and Onions can all be planted outside in the middle or end of June. To be sure, you should check your last frost date.
-Broccoli, Carrots, Cauliflower, Kale, Lettuce, Parsnip, Potatoes, Radishes, and Spinach should all be planted outside at the beginning to middle of July.
-Beets, Corn, Cucumbers, Leek, Melons, Okra, Peppers, Squash, Swiss Chard Tomatoes, and Watermelon should be planted no earlier than mid-July.

Zones 6-8 Middle United States

-Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage Peas, and Onions can all be planted outside in the middle or end of March. To be sure, you should check your frost date.
-Broccoli, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Kale, Lettuce, Parsnip, Potatoes, Radishes, and Spinach should all be planted outside at the beginning to middle of April.
-Beets and Swiss Chard should be planted no earlier than mid-April.
-Corn, Cucumbers, Leek, Melons, Okra, Peppers, Squash, Tomatoes, and Watermelon should be planted in the beginning to middle of May.
-Green Beans, Celery, Eggplant, Pumpkins, and Sweet Potatoes should not be planted toward the end of May.

Zones 9-11 Lower United States

-Beets, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage Peas, and Onions can all be planted outside in the middle or end of October. To be sure, you should check your frost date.
-Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Kale, Lettuce, Parsnip, Potatoes, Radishes, and Spinach should all be planted outside at the beginning to middle of November.
-Corn, Cucumbers, Leek, Melons, Okra, Peppers, Squash, Swiss Chard Tomatoes, and Watermelon should be planted in the beginning to middle of December.
-Green Beans, Eggplant, Pumpkins, and Sweet Potatoes should not be planted toward the end of January or beginning of February.

Zones 12-13 (Hawaiian Islands and Puerto Rico)

-Brussels Sprouts, Cauliflower, Lettuce, and Onions can all be planted outside in the beginning of May.
-Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Kale, Leek, Parsnip, Peas, Potatoes, Radishes, and Spinach should all be planted outside in the middle to end of May.
-Beets, Melons, Okra, Peppers, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, and Watermelon should be planted in June.

Flowers

As with vegetables, different flowers do best if they are planted at different times of the year. However, with flowers, there are perennials and annuals, tubers, bulbs, and seeds. Annuals just bloom for one year and then die off so you have to plant new ones the following year. Perennials come back year after year and most can be divided to make more. Most annuals are planted as seedlings (small plants) that are already blooming while perennials are usually bulbs or tubers that you have to plant in the fall and then it will sprout in the spring or summer, depending on the type of flower. However, annuals usually bloom for the whole spring and summer (and sometimes into the fall) while perennials only bloom for about a month and then they are gone until next year.

-Begonia is an annual that is usually planted as a seedling in the spring after the last frost.
-Crocus is a perennial that is planted as a bulb that you plant in the late summer, fall, or early winter and they are dormant in winter.
-Daylily is a perennial tuber that you plant in late summer or fall. They are dormant during the winter.
-Dianthus is an annual planted when it is a seedling after the last frost.
-Geraniums are annuals in most areas but in really warm climates such as zones 11 and 12, they can be perennials. You should not plant them until well after the last frost.
-Gladioli are perennials that are planted as corms in the spring and then dig up and bring in during the winter unless you live in zones 9-12.
-Hyacinth is a perennial that is planted in the fall and do not need to be removed in the winter.
-Impatiens are one of the most popular annuals that you can plant right after the last frost. They are usually planted as seedlings.
-Iris are perennial rhizomes that you plant in the spring and do not have to be removed in the winter.
-Marigold is another popular annual that is usually planted as a seedling after the last frost.
-Pansy may be an annual or perennial depending on where you live. In zones 8-12, they will likely come back every year.
-Petunia is another common annual that is often planted from a seedling after the last frost.
-Roses are the most popular perennial and is usually planted as a bare root plant in the spring.
-Tulips are the second most popular perennial and are planted as a bulb in the summer or fall.
-Zinnia is an annual that is planted after the last frost as a seedling.

I know there are many more vegetables, flowers, fruits, bushes, and even trees that I did not list here (I cannot list them all) but I tried to list the most popular. If you have any suggestions or information, feel free to mention them in the comments below.