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Birdcage Evening-primrose, Dune Primrose, Desert Primrose,

Anogra deltoidea

Family: Onagraceae (on-uh-GRAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Anogra
Species: deltoidea (del-TOY-dee-uh) (Info)
Synonym:Oenothera deltoides

Category:

Annuals

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage Color:

Bronze

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Silver Springs, Nevada

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Nov 21, 2009, sonoranpoet from Cave Creek, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

Mine grows beautifully here in Phoenix it bloomed well in the spring and now is now blooming again this fall. It is magnificent. It gets a little shade in the afternoon but has sun in the hottest/longest part of the day. On a scale of 1-10 for growing ease I'd give it an 8 and in Arizona that's a great thing! I bought mine from a local nursery specializing in desert plants.

Positive

On May 5, 2008, kmom246 from Murfreesboro, TN (Zone 7a) wrote:

They grow wild here in the alkali sands of the Nevada Great Basin high desert. Where I live, they only show up during long, (relatively) wet, cool springs. Blooms open in the evening and on cloudy days. One site says that they grow below 3,500 feet above sea level, but we are well above that at 4,200 feet and they seem to do well any time it rains or snows a lot in the spring. As soon as the 90*F weather arrives, they disappear. I have seen hawk moths fluttering around them, but I have not observed them actually drinking nectar from them. I have NOT seen hawk moth caterpillars on them.

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