Quiabentia

Quiabentia verticillata

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Quiabentia (kwee-uh-BEN-tee-uh) (Info)
Species: verticillata (ver-ti-si-LAH-tuh) (Info)
Synonym:Pereskia verticillata
Synonym:Pereskia pflanzii
Synonym:Quiabentia pflanzii
Synonym:Quiabentia chacoensis
Synonym:Quiabentia pereziensis

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Rose/Mauve

Red

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Succulent

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Scottsdale, Arizona

Crystal River, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 29, 2012, martenfisher from Crystal River, FL wrote:

I grow this plant in pots in central Florida. This is one of my favorite plants. It has leaves like a jade plant and a trunk like a Cylindropuntia and then grows to be a tree. The spines are very long and like Opuntia and Cylindropuntia it makes glochids. I make cuttings from it and it replaces each cutting with more buds. The cuttings often lose the leaves and under stress the whole plant can lose the leaves. If you keep it happy and stable it will keep them. This plant is perfect for pots but it is best to upsize the pots to not stunt the plant. It will only make a tree in frost free zones. Makes a very interesting plant.

Neutral

On Jul 7, 2005, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

Quiabentia's are a members of the subfamily Opuntiodeae and have larger leaves that stay attached longer than some other genera. The stems resemble the shape of pencils. There are only 2 species in this genus.

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