Ipomoea Species, Morning Glory, Pink Throat Morning Glory

Ipomoea longifolia

Family: Convolvulaceae (kon-volv-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Ipomoea (ip-oh-MEE-a) (Info)
Species: longifolia (lon-jee-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Vines and Climbers

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Deciduous

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Hereford, Arizona

Sierra Vista, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

Gardeners' Notes:

1
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0
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RatingContent
Positive

On Sep 12, 2014, andywedel from Tucson, AZ wrote:

This is a beautiful, rare plant native to southern Arizona. It comes up in the early summer (timed presumably for the monsoon rains) and blooms prolifically through August.

Our plant is robust, but yet never sets seed. Does any one know if this plant is not self-fertile? Any experiences propagating it vegetatively?

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