Bay Starvine, Bay Star-vine, Climbing Magnolia, Magnolia Vine, Wild Sarsaparilla

Schisandra glabra

Family: Schisandraceae
Genus: Schisandra (skiz-AN-dra) (Info)
Species: glabra (GLAY-bruh) (Info)
Synonym:Schisandra coccinea

Category:

Vines and Climbers

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Chartreuse/Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Red

Red-Orange

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By simple layering

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Birmingham, Alabama

Lisle, Illinois

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Sep 14, 2017, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

I saw a good specimen at Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IL in the Appalachian Collection on the east side in early September 2017. It looks good! It has alternate arranged leaves and climbs by twining. It has inconspicuous flowers that are maroon colored and are borne solitary or in loose clusters. It is found in scattered locations in the southeastern US; not common.

Positive

On Jul 25, 2017, Ted_B from Birmingham, AL (Zone 8a) wrote:

This species is virtually impossible to find in commerce and not often encountered in the wild, which is unfortunate. In the SE USA, S. glabra is indigenous to damp, riparian forests, although its habitat is increasingly being choked with invasive ornamentals such as Lonicera japonica (Japanese Honeysuckle). Given its demonstrable cold hardiness (proven in Zone 5) and habitats of its dysjunctive Asian cousins, I suspect the original range of this species was more northerly, but like numerous others, was pushed south by glaciation during the last ice age. A recent scientific study demonstrated the fruit of S. glabra to possess comparable medicinal virtues to that of S. chinensis, much in the same way that P. quinquifolius is comparable to P. ginseng, which endows S. glabra with untapped "su... read more

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