Common Cocklebur, Rough Cocklebur

Xanthium strumarium var. glabratum

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Xanthium (ZAN-thee-um) (Info)
Species: strumarium var. glabratum
Synonym:Xanthium americanum
Synonym:Xanthium chinense
Synonym:Xanthium macrocarpum

Category:

Annuals

Ponds and Aquatics

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Green

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Wear gloves to protect hands when handling seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Westchester, Illinois

San Antonio, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Oct 18, 2005, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

Common Cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium var. glabratum) is a weedy, taprooted, wetland native plant that is widely distributed throughtout the USA. It is not native to 11 states. It can be found growing around watering holes, arroyas, playas, cropland (especially corn fields), fallow fields, degraded meadows, stabilized areas of beaches and sand dunes, the floodplain zone of rivers and ponds, vacant lots and disturbed areas. It prefers a loamy or sandy and moist to mesic (neither to moist nor too dry) soil.

Common cocklebur leaves are alternate, toothed and lobed. The male and female blooms, which are both inconspicuous, occur on the same plant. The female bloom appears at the leaf axil and the male bloom producing only pollen occurs in dense clusters at the ends of the ... read more

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