Phlomoides Species, Tuberous Jerusalem Sage

Phlomoides tuberosa

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Phlomoides
Species: tuberosa (too-ber-OH-suh) (Info)
Synonym:Phlomis tuberosa

Category:

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Lavender

Medium Purple

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

San Leandro, California

Boise, Idaho

Cherry Valley, Illinois

Elizabeth City, North Carolina

Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania

Norfolk, Virginia

Kalama, Washington

Wild Rose, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 30, 2006, Joy from Kalama, WA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Gorgeous plant. Grew this from seed and it took 4 years before it bloomed the first time. Has only bloomed every other year in my garden sense for some reason? But it's such a beautiful plant when in bloom that it's worth growing in spite of it. Mine is growing in a large container so this may have something to do with the lack of bloom in some years.

Neutral

On Mar 21, 2004, crystalspin from Santa Ana, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

JUST A WARNING:
Mine died to the ground (its first year: USDA 9b/10a, Sunset 23) and on returning the SLUGS almost defoliated it before I even noticed it was coming back! Apparently the new growth is slug candy, although I don't remember the 'hardened' plant having a problem last year -- possibly because last year it was pretty much by itself but this spring many self-seeded Nigella are providing a living mulch so the environment is moister and more to the slugs' liking.
I applied iron phosphate pellets ('sluggo' is a brand) rather more heavily than prob. necessary, and the plant is going to make it!

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