Luculia Species

Luculia pinceana

Family: Rubiaceae
Genus: Luculia (lew-KEW-lee-uh) (Info)
Species: pinceana
Synonym:Luculia intermedia
Synonym:Luculia intermedia var. pubescens
Synonym:Luculia pinceana var. pubescens

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Foliage:

Evergreen

Textured

Velvet/Fuzzy

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are fragrant

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Winter

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

Direct sow as soon as the ground can be worked

By tip layering

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Alameda, California

San Francisco, California(2 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Dec 18, 2016, lancer23 from San Francisco, CA wrote:

Smell this shrub first before seeing it. Its the middle of our temperate winter and beginning to cover with pale clusters of blooms. I first thought it can be related to the salvia or fushias but its a rare and unique shrub. The flowers are bigger then dahpnes. The shrub form is rather loose like a fushia and not bushy like a daphne. Not likely to find it at gardening center or nursery. I saw it at the botanical garden in SF, one of those rare plants that flowers in the winter.

Neutral

On Aug 9, 2006, Basha_O from Redwood City, CA wrote:

Native to Nepal, Luculia pinceana may not be as well known as the more common and larger Luculia gratissima from the Himalayas, but it is certainly worth searching for. It only grows about 3 metres high and has compact rosy pink tubular flowers in a tight head much like a hydrangea. The flowers have a very sweet, delicious musk-jasmine fragrance that can be smelled up to 15 metres away. While it is usually an evergreen shrub, in cooler climates it will become semi-deciduous. It is frost tender to 5 degrees, it is best grown in a warm sheltered position, filtered light in slightly acidic soils rich in organic material, but needs considerable summer watering. It can be propagated by seed sown in spring, or soft tip cuttings taken in late spring. It is an ideal addition to a garden where rhod... read more

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