Ipomoea Species, Hawaiian Moonflower

Ipomoea tuboides

Family: Convolvulaceae (kon-volv-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Ipomoea (ip-oh-MEE-a) (Info)
Species: tuboides
Synonym:Ipomoea tuboides var. pubescens

Category:

Annuals

Perennials

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Vines and Climbers

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

Unknown - Tell us

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 25, 2010, grovespirit from Sunset Valley, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

Threatened status pending in Hawaii. Native Hawaiian plant, which should be (but is not yet) protected by law. Conservation group in Hawaii is attempting to get a law passed which will make it illegal to collect any part of this plant, including seeds, from the wild.

Has historic and cultural significance to Hawaii- unlike the regular Moonflower. This Native Hawaiian moonflower has a very limited natural range. Tends to die when people attempt to grow it in other areas. Even if taken to some other tropical setting, it won't usually survive outside of its preferred coastal niche. So- please if you see this plant, take photos but leave the plant, and its seeds, where they are.

This species of moonflower is a Hawaiian native and also endemic to the Hawaiian islan... read more

Neutral

On Dec 25, 2005, RON_CONVOLVULACEAE from Netcong, NJ (Zone 5b) wrote:

Hawaiians ate roots and stems in time of famine.

BACK TO TOP