Vigna, Asparagus Bean, Yardlong Bean 'Stickless Wonder'

Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis

Family: Fabaceae (fab-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Vigna (VIG-nuh) (Info)
Species: unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis
Cultivar: Stickless Wonder

Category:

Annuals

Vegetables

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Brandon, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 21, 2011, astcgirl from Brandon, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

I tried this type of Yardlong bean this year and had a great success. I planted them early June in Florida in a stacker pot. I love yardlong beans but don't have a lot of space for their long vines to climb. The Stacking pot worked out well with them. They only grew about a foot tall and produced multiple beans of about 15" long for about 2 months. They even tried to give another small round after that. Great tasting beans. Mine were not bothered by any pests or ants like my usual yardlong ones were, not sure if that was because they were off the ground though. Will be planting them again in my huge 6 stacker next season.

Neutral

On Jan 5, 2006, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

This is a unique bush type yardlong bean which can be grown without poles and supports. Plants grow vigorously in warm climates and are very productive, producing light green pods of about 15 inches long. This variety starts to have flowers 40 days after sowing. Densive planting and high yielding can be obtained, suitable for commercial production and home gardening.

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