Chrysojasminum Species, Shrubby Jasmine

Chrysojasminum fruticans

Family: Oleaceae (oh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Chrysojasminum
Species: fruticans (FROO-tih-kanz) (Info)
Synonym:Jasminum fruticans

Category:

Shrubs

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Blooms repeatedly

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Denver, Colorado

Lexington, Massachusetts

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 10, 2015, Shirrush from Ramat Gan,
Israel wrote:

Our community garden near Tel Aviv has a plan for a row of locally occurring flowering shrubs, and I've been collecting propagation material for this purpose. I found Jasminum fruticans in the wild, near Malkishu'a on Mount Gilboa, on March 10, 2015. This plant is not rare, but it is rather patchily distributed in Israel's Mediterranean shrubland (Batha), and it is found in widely separate spots, mostly in the North. It has not yet been adopted by gardeners who prefer more fragrant and showy exotic species, and our local Botanical Garden at Tel Aviv University has had some difficulty establishing it here in the sandy coastal region.
I am trying to root the few cuttings I took, and I shall update this page accordingly.

Positive

On Dec 14, 2012, 45eriepa from Lexington, MA wrote:

Leaves are lost over winter but the stems remain green. It has taken a long time to make a splash, perhaps helped now by global warming. Jim Jones

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