Loquat, Japanese Plum 'Fatma'

Eriobotrya japonica

Family: Rosaceae (ro-ZAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Eriobotrya (er-ee-oh-BOT-ree-uh) (Info)
Species: japonica (juh-PON-ih-kuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Fatma

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Trees

Foliage Color:

Bronze-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Fall/Early Winter

Mid Winter

Foliage:

Evergreen

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Leathery-Textured

Provides winter interest

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Yucaipa, California

Lake Worth, Florida

Land O Lakes, Florida

Venice, Florida

Ellicott City, Maryland

Austin, Texas

Cibolo, Texas

El Paso, Texas

San Marcos, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Sep 25, 2011, Raykhona from Ellicott City, MD (Zone 7b) wrote:

I have a loquat in Zone 7b and it does very well. In their native China they grow in the mountains at elevations between 3000 and 7000 feet, so they are pretty cold-hardy (good to around ~10F). However, the fruit will not ripen if the temperature dips below 27F, so if you're looking to get fruit off your tree I recommend bringing it inside for the winter if you live in areas cold winters (that's what I do). If you want it just for ornamental purposes you can leave it outside. They are easy to grow and quick-growing in warm weather. The fruit tastes like a combination of pears, apples, and oranges. A good plant for beginners.

Positive

On Mar 15, 2006, IslandJim from Keizer, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

Nice cultivar. Less rhan two seeds per fruit.

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