Marah Species, Cucamonga Manroot, Man-Root, Wild Cucumber

Marah macrocarpa

Family: Cucurbitaceae (koo-ker-bih-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Marah (MAIR-uh) (Info)
Species: macrocarpa (ma-kro-KAR-pa) (Info)
Synonym:Echinocystis macrocarpa

Category:

Vines and Climbers

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Full Shade

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Los Angeles, California

Malibu, California

Menifee, California

Poway, California

San Diego, California

Valley Center, California

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
0
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Mar 19, 2011, ellaB from Los Angeles, CA wrote:

This plant is quickly spreading over parks and gardens or anything it can grab, over southern California. the roots can be enormous. I was wondering if park rangers or any ecological experts do about this condition. This plant can easily smother all other plants. it absorbs a large amount of water from the ground and other plants and its capacity of reproducing is alien like. I am worried about our precious green remaining parks, and our neighborhoods.

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