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Aloe Species

Aloe inexpectata

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: inexpectata
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Foliage:

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Red-Orange

Pale Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Aug 30, 2009, Porphyrostachys from Portland, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

This species doesn't thrive in excessive heat like that experienced in the Phoenix area during the summer. It seems these higher elevation Malagasy Aloes (inexpectata, droseroides, pronkii, conifera, madecassa, capitata var. cipolinicola, cryptoflora, etc.) suffer "heat rot" when the temperatures are consistently at, near, or above 110 degrees. They're used to cooler temperatures in their native habitat and tend to fail after a few years unless kept indoors or in a greenhouse with a cooling system in Phoenix.

Positive

On Jun 12, 2006, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a really dinky aloe species from Madagascar that is a bit tricky (at least for me) to grow in zone 10a. It is a blue-green to grey aloe, distichous and with curving red teeth. It is a pretty slow grower and I have no idea how large it will eventually get, but the largest plant I have seen was 4" tall. The leaves are only about 2" long and very closely spaced on top of each other, and tend to be curled in making a nearly tubular shape. Typical of many small species, this one does not prefer full sun. It lives under the partial or full shade of other plants, like some other dinky Madagascan aloes.

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