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Teak

Tectona grandis

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tectona (tec-TAWN-uh) (Info)
Species: grandis (GRAN-dees) (Info)
Synonym:Jatus grandis
Synonym:Tectona theca
Synonym:Theka grandis

Category:

Trees

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Deciduous

Velvet/Fuzzy

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Late Fall/Early Winter

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Scarify seed before sowing

By grafting

By budding

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Kurtistown, Hawaii

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 4, 2006, nalin1 from New Delhi,
India (Zone 10a) wrote:

My earliest memories of tall teak trees are as a student at boarding school in the foothills of the Himalayas--the Shivalik range, where teak forests on the hillsides were a common sight. At that time I remember thinking that the trees were not a pretty sight and today also I don't find them attractive. The leaves are coarse and card paper stiff, and the overall appearance of the tree is kind of scraggly looking even when it has leaves. A large tree it seems to be out of place in a residential garden setting--it is more at home as a roadside tree. At the same time, some people consider it an ornamental tree for gardens.

However, despite its slow growth and overall unattractive appearance of the tree, it is one of the most prized woods for fine furniture, decorative veneers... read more

Neutral

On Jul 17, 2006, Dinu from Mysore,
India (Zone 10a) wrote:

It grows easily without much care. Reasonably fast grower. But if it is grown for its timber, it will take about 20 years for it to reach a 'harvesting' stage. Leaves are huge and provides good shade. Wood is preferred in construction work etc., for its amazing property of keeping termites away. The oil in the wood is the key. Once the oil dries out - it takes many many years - then it will become liable for termite attack.

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