Begonia Species

Begonia sizemoreae

Family: Begoniaceae (be-gon-ee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Begonia (be-GON-yuh) (Info)
Species: sizemoreae (size-MOR-ee-ay) (Info)
Additional cultivar information:(aka U388)
» View all varieties of Begonias

Classification:

Rhizomatous

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Good Fall Color

Succulent

Veined

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From leaf cuttings

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Foliage Color:

Bronze

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Calistoga, California

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
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RatingContent
Positive

On Nov 6, 2010, DCTropics from Washington, DC wrote:

This has proven a very easy species to grow in the ground in Washington, DC. Requires bright shade, rich well-drained soil and constant moisture but is somewhat drought tolerant. The plant blooms heavily over a long period and the flowers are fragrant. Not harmed by temperatures in the low 30's. Not tested for hardiness but comes from northern Vietnam and not expected to be hardy. Previously grown as Begonia "U388".

Begonia longiciliata is not a synonym but rather a previous misidentification of this species. True B. longiciliata is now considered a synonym of B. rex.

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