Aloe Species

Aloe ankoberensis

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: ankoberensis

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

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Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

Unknown - Tell us

Spacing:

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Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

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Danger:

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Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

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Bloom Time:

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Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Sonoma, California

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
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negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Nov 29, 2020, cabngirl from Sonoma, CA wrote:

I am growing this plant in Sonoma CA (9A). I have only had it a couple years (which experienced mild winters) and I cover it in winter. It is a beautiful plant with luminous, celadon-turquoise leaves that can attain some lovely rose-mauve hues when stressed, (as my first photo shows just after taking the winter covering off). I haven't tested its hardiness sans protection. It grows on cliff walls in habitat in Ethiopia so I have found a stand upon which I tilt the pot to simulate a slope position. It would be stunning in a rock garden/wall. NOTE: The photo posted here in the gallery credited to Cok Grootscholten is incorrect- that image is Aloe anivoranoensis (the same) as shown on Cok's Madagascan page: [... read more

Neutral

On Aug 17, 2011, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Yes, this Ethiopian native is one of the more spectacular of the stemless, rosette-shaped aloes, having short, thick, numerous triangular, red-lined leaves forming rosettes up to several feet across. It is a plant designed for growing on step slopes. Inflorescences are multibranched and red. Never seen one in real life, but in photos it is amazing.

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