Cocona

Solanum sessiliflorum

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Solanum (so-LAN-num) (Info)
Species: sessiliflorum (sess-il-ee-FLOR-um) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Perennials

Shrubs

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Evergreen

Succulent

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From woody stem cuttings

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Brooksville, Florida

Sarasota, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

1
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0
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RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 28, 2010, davecito from Carrboro, NC wrote:


Cocona is a very close (may hybridize) relative of pseudolulo and naranjilla/lulo; it seems slightly easier to grow. Slightly smaller in stature than its' closest relatives, it is perhaps more suitable for indoor/container growing, though (due to leaf size) the plant will need a lot of space.

Like naranjilla, cocona has large attractive leaves; the entire plant is covered in fine peach fuzz. Most parts of the plant are toxic if ingested, though the (very tart) fruit is edible, and very very good.

Not quite as fragile as the naranjilla, however keep an eye out for the same sorts of pests. Loves sunshine; seedlings will love your windowsill. Might not be as well-suited to dry climates - hot AND humid weather seems to keep them happy. Sensitive to ... read more

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