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Schefflera Species, Umbrella Plant

Schefflera taiwaniana

Family: Araliaceae
Genus: Schefflera (shef-LER-uh) (Info)
Species: taiwaniana
Synonym:Agalma taiwanianum

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Partial to Full Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Textured

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lincoln,

San Jose, California

Portland, Oregon

Seattle, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 2, 2017, Nanthawat from Portland, OR (Zone 8b) wrote:

So far this plant has survived three rounds of cold snaps here in Portland, OR. The temperatures got down to ~20 with snow and ice yet this plant is still looking sharp. Let's see if it will survive this next, upcoming dry cold and windy week.

Neutral

On Aug 5, 2016, longjonsilverz from Centreville, MD wrote:

I tried 2 of these this year in Eastern Maryland (zone 7). One in a pot in the shade and another in the ground in the shade but with some morning sun. As soon as the temperatures got in the upper 80's in the spring, the one in the ground got scorched by the sun. Later in the summer when the temperatures started to get consistently above 90F, they both began to die. Since I have not had these long enough to definitively say what the reason is, I won't say for certain what the cause of death was, but it definitely appears to be the heat or the high humidity. Unfortunately the expensive price combined with the difficulty of finding these plants makes it not really worth trying these here again unless I can find a good deal. These are probably much better suited for the West Coast and oth... read more

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