Ajwain

Trachyspermum copticum

Family: Apiaceae (ay-pee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Trachyspermum (trak-ee-SPER-mum) (Info)
Species: copticum

Category:

Herbs

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

Unknown - Tell us

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Blooms all year

Blooms repeatedly

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Houston, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 18, 2010, btc129psu from Houston, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

A really interesting herb used in a lot of Ethiopian cooking and spice blends. Its Amharic (the common language of Ethiopia) name is "nach azmud." Seeds contain about %50 thyme oil and though they are very small, they pack a powerful punch of thyme flavor.

In Texas, this plant is easy to grow from seed; however, because its umbels produce so many small seeds so freely, it can self sow aggressively if not kept in check and it has the hardiness of a weed. I have had plants grow through every month of the year though they do best in whatever you might consider Houston's spring and early fall. They are pretty drought tolerant but grow best with regular watering.

Neutral

On Apr 12, 2010, therica from Falling Waters, WV (Zone 7a) wrote:

Correctly called Trachyspermum copticum. Known as Ajwain in its native India.

Incorrectly called "Bishop's Weed" (which is Ammi majus) due to its similar appearance to Bishop's Weed to the English, a plant primarily found and grown in India for its caraway-appearance spicy seeds which are used in Indian flatbread (Paratha) and taste somewhat like thyme and caraway.

Note the Wikipedia article for Ajwain, which explains the plant and also the confusion and terminology errors associated with the plant's history.

The ITIS (Integrated Taxonomic Information System) no longer accepts the descriptive terms Ammi copticum, Carum copticum or Trachyspermum ammi for this plant.

BACK TO TOP