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Scutellaria, Pink Texas Skullcap, Cherry Skullcap 'Texas Rose'

Scutellaria suffrutescens

Family: Lamiaceae (lay-mee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Scutellaria (skew-teh-LARE-ee) (Info)
Species: suffrutescens (suf-roo-TES-kens) (Info)
Cultivar: Texas Rose

Category:

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Fuchsia (red-purple)

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Diego, California

Parker, Colorado

Austin, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 2, 2019, 1amore1 from San Diego, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

This plant is probably the most underrated plant in my garden, I've never fertilized it and I often forget to water it, yet it blooms and looks lush.

Positive

On Mar 26, 2010, BajaBlue from Rancho Santa Rita, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

This delightful Mexican skullcap makes a wonderfully durable, attractive, and easy-to-grow gem for the rock garden. 14-year-old plant is 8" tall x 18" wide. In spring, this dwarf mound is smothered in tiny fruit-punch-colored, snapdragon-like flowers that continue
sporadically through the summer This selection was originally collected in 1986 by Dave Creech, Ray Jordan, and the late Lynn Lowery, near Horsetail Falls, west of Monterrey, Mexico.

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