Bearded Protea

Protea magnifica

Family: Proteaceae (pro-tee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Protea (PROH-tee-uh) (Info)
Species: magnifica (mag-NIH-fee-kuh) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Shrubs

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are good for cutting

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pink

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Winter

Foliage:

Evergreen

Leathery-Textured

Provides winter interest

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From seed; stratify if sowing indoors

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
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RatingContent
Neutral

On Feb 2, 2008, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have not grown this plant which is indigenous to South Africa. Protea magnifica (formerly Protea barbigera) 8 inch across flowers are indeed magnificent. Its bract colors range from soft pink to deep rose to strong red. The apex is tinged black with small downy white flowers. Protea magnifica may takeup to 4 years to flower when grown from seed.

Neutral

On Nov 19, 2007, Kell from Northern California, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

This is an excellent cut flower and has been used to create many hybrids. A more tolerant protea of drought and frost once well established. Does not like humidity. Flowers are big and furry!

The genus Protea was named after the Greek God Proteus who could assume many shapes because like him, Proteas come in so many different forms. The king protea, Protea cynaroides is the national flower of South Africa where most originate from the mountainous coastal land of Cape Flora region. They are now grown in New Zealand, Australia, California and Hawaii.

Proteas will attract bees and birds to your garden. They are full of nectar and often are called sugarbushes. Some are so sticky from nectar, insects actually get trapped in them. They grow best in full sun... read more

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