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Hybrid Aloe 'Black Gem'

X Alworthia

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: X Alworthia (al-WER-thee-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Black Gem
Synonym:Aloe

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Foliage Color:

Dark/Black

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Brentwood, California

Oakland, California

Palo Alto, California

Pleasant Hill, California

San Leandro, California

Sunnyvale, California

Vista, California

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Jan 29, 2008, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is fairly common garden cultivar, but I am unsure what its origins are. I have found one Aloe clone that is a cross-generic hybrid between Haworthia cymbiformis and Aloe speciosa. This plant looks very little like Aloe speciosa but it is a low-growing, prolifically offsetting plant about the right size for Haworthia cymbiformis... but no idea if that is what it really is. All photos I find of this plant are obviously of the same hybrid, a bright green, short, suckering aloe with triangular, thick leaves and a tendency to fade to black near the leaf tips, particularly in hot summer. Looks like it should be related to the Walmsley hybrids as it looks similar though a bit beefier. Supposedly a fairly cold-hardy hybrid.

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