Frangula Species, Alder Buckthorn, Glossy Buckthorn, Tallhedge Buckthorn

Frangula alnus

Family: Rhamnaceae
Genus: Frangula (FRANG-yoo-luh) (Info)
Species: alnus (AL-nus) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Smooth

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 2a: to -45.5 C (-50 F)

USDA Zone 2b: to -42.7 C (-45 F)

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Wear gloves to protect hands when handling seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Cascade, Colorado

Richland, Iowa

Watertown, New York

Youngstown, Ohio

South Jordan, Utah

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
3
negatives
RatingContent
Negative

On Jul 4, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

This is an invasive shrub in America from Europe, west Asia and north Africa also. I finally saw the straight species along a chain link fence between the highway and a motel in Youngstown, Ohio in June 2015 as a weed shrub. I've seen the two cultivars of 'Columnaris' that is an upright columnar form and 'Asplenifolia' that has deeply dissected foliage in a few places. Not a lovely plant.

Negative

On Feb 11, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

With shrub honeysuckles, glossy buckthorn (Frangula alnus, Rhamnus frangula) often forms solid understories in natural forest areas of northeastern North America. Like the honeysuckles, it leafs out very early, shading out the native herbaceous layer.

This spiny invasive species is a listed noxious weed, invasive, or banned in five states. Birds eat the fruit and then distribute the seed far and wide through the landscape.

This species was used for hedging in the 19th century, but it went out of use as better hedging plants became available.

Negative

On Nov 3, 2007, distantkin from Saint Cloud, MN (Zone 4b) wrote:

MN DNR has this plant listed as invasive. From their website....
"Regulations
European or common buckthorn and glossy or alder buckthorn are listed as restricted noxious weeds in Minnesota. It is illegal to import, sell, or transport buckthorn in Minnesota."

Neutral

On Aug 28, 2002, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

Upright and densely foliaged and doesn't need to be trimmed much. It can reach 15 ft high, though. Flowers are insignificant.

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