Aloe 'Christmas Carol'

Aloe

Family: Aloaceae
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Cultivar: Christmas Carol
Hybridized by Griffin

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Red

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Red

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Succulent

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

San Francisco, California

Winter Springs, Florida

Metairie, Louisiana

Smithville, Missouri

Dallas, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jan 21, 2015, poeciliopsis from Phoenix, AZ wrote:

Central Phoenix -- I have an Aloe Christmas Carol, planted in spring 2012. It has grown, adding several heads and blooms at least twice a year (December, May). This hybrid seems able to take more sun than some -- the location gets afternoon summer sun and several succulents I tried there have not survived. It receives subsurface water bi-weekly from yard irrigation lapping against the bed wall. This plant is covered in winter, but another plant of this hybrid was put into an uncovered bed last fall and suffered no damage from the 26F freeze in Dec. 2014.

Positive

On Nov 4, 2012, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is a spectacular hybrid- one of the most colorful Kelly Griffin creations... and a hardy, easy little suckering plant

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