Castilleja Species, Desert Paintbrush, Showy Northwestern Indian Paintbrush

Castilleja angustifolia var. dubia

Family: Orobanchaceae
Genus: Castilleja (kas-tee-LEE-uh) (Info)
Species: angustifolia var. dubia
Synonym:Castilleja chromosa
Synonym:Castilleja ewanii
Synonym:Castilleja pyramidalis

Category:

Perennials

Parasites and Hemiparasites

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Red

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Sedona, Arizona

Springdale, Utah

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On May 25, 2019, Kell from Northern California, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

Per Jan Emming, of Destination:Forever Ranch and Gardens, a 40 acre desert botanical garden/sustainable living homestead, AZ.:
"Scarlet Indian paintbrush (Castilleja chromosa) is a favorite wildflower that appears in mid-spring at lower and middle-elevation desert habitats. Highly showy, these hemiparasites draw some of their nutrition from other plants, as do a number of other desert species I've featured lately. Apparently political considerations are pressuring people to drop the "Indian" portion of the common name, shortening it to simply "paintbrush". Regardless of the name, the beauty won't change and neither will the appeal it holds to both humans and hummingbirds.

The red "petals" are actually modified colored leaves called bracts, and the actual flower is an ... read more

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