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Gentiana, Gentian 'Braemar'

Gentiana

Family: Gentianaceae (jen-shun-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Gentiana (jen-shee-AN-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Braemar

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Groundcovers

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Medium Blue

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Evergreen

Herbaceous

Smooth-Textured

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From herbaceous stem cuttings

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Mar 9, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

A compact, long-blooming rock garden plant for acid soil. It is not a ground cover. The trumpet-shaped flowers are a strong royal blue with white stripes.

This is a Berrybank Hybrid, raised in 1999-2003 by Ian McNaughton of Macplants in East Lothian near Edinburgh in Scotland. The parents are not known but may include G. veitchorum and G. hexaphylla.

Positive

On Mar 9, 2015, mensamom from Laurens, SC (Zone 7b) wrote:

Gentian named after King Gentius of Illyria in the Adriatic. He discovered medicinal uses for gentians around 180 B.C. Iroquois used Bottle gentian to ease pain from headaches and muscle aches, to cure lonesomeness and craziness. Hanging dried root around the house warded off witches. Meskwaki cured snake bites and "caked breast" with the plant.

Most information regarding this plant originates from the UK. Gentiana andrewsii "Bottle gentian" is native to Wisconsin.

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