Aloe Species

Aloe ampefyana

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Species: ampefyana

Category:

Alpines and Rock Gardens

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Provides Winter Interest

This plant is fire-retardant

Foliage Color:

Chartreuse/Yellow

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Where to Grow:

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Coral/Apricot

Orange

Red-Orange

Gold (yellow-orange)

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
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RatingContent
Neutral

On Aug 17, 2011, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Madagascan native, thought by some to be a naturally growing hybrid species. Has a short stem like a small tree aloe. Flowers red, turning to yellow as they open. Very rare in cultivation (2011)

Neutral

On Jul 22, 2011, thistlesifter from Vista, CA wrote:

This is a new plant described in 2007 and documented in The new Aloe book 'Aloes The Definitive Guide', S. Carter, J. J. Lavranos, L. E. Newton, C. C. Walker and published by Royal Boantic Gardens.

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