Papaya 'Solo'

Carica papaya

Family: Caricaceae
Genus: Carica (KAIR-ih-kuh) (Info)
Species: papaya (puh-PIE-yuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Solo

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Succulent

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Blooms all year

Blooms repeatedly

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Palm Desert, California

Big Pine Key, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 13, 2018, gatobut from Palm Desert, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

I've never seen anything grow so quickly. I purchased a 3-gallon container and planted in April (in the low desert). It's against the southwest-facing wall and gets the brunt of the hot summer heat. The plant was small so I thought it would take a while to grow, but zoom, it has just taken off without much help from me. It only gets watered every other day but has already passed four feet and is already providing shade for other plants. Not sure how it will handle the desert in winter, but for now, it's a superstar.

Positive

On Aug 9, 2011, olddude from Big Pine Key, FL (Zone 11) wrote:

Named 'Solo' in 1919 and by 1936 was the only commercial papaya in the islands. 'Solo' produces no male plants; just female (with round, shallowly furrowed fruits) and bisexual (with pear-shaped fruits) in equal proportions.

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