King Protea, Giant Protea, Honeypot, King Sugar Bush 'King Protea'

Protea cynaroides

Family: Proteaceae (pro-tee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Protea (PROH-tee-uh) (Info)
Species: cynaroides (sin-nar-OY-deez) (Info) (sin-ar-OY-deez) (Info)
Cultivar: King Protea

Category:

Shrubs

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Textured

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Not Applicable

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

Pink

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are good for cutting

Flowers are good for drying and preserving

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Hayward, California

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 27, 2013, RosinaBloom from Waihi,
New Zealand (Zone 1) wrote:

King Protea - the national flower of South Africa - is a woody shrub with thick stems and large dark green, glossy leaves, and has the largest flower head in the genus. This unusual flower has a long vase life in flower arrangements, and makes for an excellent dried flower. Protea cynaroides adapt to survive wildfires by their thick, underground stems, which contain many dormant buds, and these produce new growth after the fire. The genus name honours the Greek sea god Proteus (son of Poseidon) who was known for being able to change his appearance at will.

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