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Aloe 'Blizzard'

Aloe

Family: Asphodelaceae (as-foh-del-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Aloe (AL-oh) (Info)
Cultivar: Blizzard
Additional cultivar information:(PP21408)
Hybridized by O'Connell
Registered or introduced: 2009

Category:

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Good Fall Color

Foliage Color:

Bronze

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone

Can be grown as an annual

Suitable for growing in containers

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Coral/Apricot

Orange

Pale Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Blooms repeatedly

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Tempe, Arizona

Vista, California(9 reports)

New Providence, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Jan 3, 2017, kwie2011 from Cottage Grove, OR wrote:

Not at all cold-hardy. I received a box of Aloes including Pickled Pink, Mimi Bell, Firebird, Snowstorm, Blizzard, and an unknown species. Snowstorm and Blizard liquified from cold temps encountered on the way. Mimi Bell, the unknown, and Pickled Pink had absolutely no cold damage at all. Firebird was damaged, but probably mechanical rather than by cold.

Blizzard and Snowstorm are both beautiful Aloes, but much more sensitive to cold than most.

Positive

On Feb 20, 2014, Fires_in_motion from Vacherie, LA (Zone 9a) wrote:

I've seen lots of smallish white aloe hybrids, but this one really caught my eye, and ended up catching my wallet. It's a hybrid of Aloe 'Doran Black' and Aloe #51 (whatever that means), hybridized by Renee O'Connell. It's better than most of the other whitish aloes because it's more powerfully built, more upright, flowers more, and freely offsets. Read tons of details at http://www.freepatentsonline.com/PP21408.html

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