Carthamus Species, American Saffron, Dyer's Saffron, False Saffron, Safflower

Carthamus tinctorius

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Carthamus (KAR-tha-mus) (Info)
Species: tinctorius (tink-TOR-ee-us) (Info)
Synonym:Centaurea carthamus

Category:

Annuals

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Gold (yellow-orange)

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

El Mirage, Arizona

Colorado Springs, Colorado

Melbourne, Kentucky

Brookeville, Maryland

Kalama, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 19, 2011, baffledq from Salt Lake City, UT (Zone 6b) wrote:

I grew this for the ornamental value. I was afraid it wouldn't get around to blooming in this climate, but it did. A wonderful dried flower--for dried blossoms, pick as the flower is opening.

Positive

On Dec 27, 2007, CaptMicha from Brookeville, MD (Zone 7a) wrote:

This cheerful little plant popped up in a part sun mulched bed underneath a bird feeder.

Safflower seeds are very nutritious to wild birds, rodents and other small animals.

They also make excellent treats for small parrots.

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