Opuntia, Prickly Pear Cactus 'Spineless'

Opuntia stricta

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Opuntia (op-UN-shee-a) (Info)
Species: stricta (STRIK-tuh) (Info)
Cultivar: Spineless

Category:

Perennials

Shrubs

Cactus and Succulents

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Feb 23, 2016, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

This is not the only spineless prickly pear. (For example, see Opuntia cacanapa 'Ellisana', which lacks both spines and glochids.)

The World Conservation Union has included this species in their list of 100 of the world's worst invasive species, one of only 32 terrestrial species so singled out. [[email protected]]

In the US, its native range is widely scattered from Texas to Virginia and coastal Florida. In Florida, it has been declared "Threatened".

It is also native to eastern Mexico, central America, northern South America, and the islands of the Caribbean.

Outside its native range, it has often proved invasive, as in... read more

Positive

On May 20, 2014, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

This is a popular cultivated spineless form that has pads with scalloped edges. The pads are also somewhat pointed at the top many times. This was previously known as (and may still be listed in various places) Opuntia gomei 'Old Mexico', but recent genetic tests indicate it is a spineless form of Opuntia stricta.

Positive

On Oct 30, 2013, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Though I am unschooled in understanding exactly how to speciate cacti, this one at least has a unique pad shape (scalloped along the edges) that makes it stand out amongst most of the Opuntias I see.

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