Gymnanthemum Species, African Bitterleaf

Gymnanthemum amygdalinum

Family: Asteraceae (ass-ter-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Gymnanthemum
Species: amygdalinum
Synonym:Vernonia adenosticta
Synonym:Vernonia amygdalina
Synonym:Vernonia giorgii
Synonym:Vernonia randii
Synonym:Vernonia vogeliana

Category:

Herbs

Perennials

Shrubs

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Herbaceous

Shiny/Glossy

Smooth

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round in hardiness zone

Can be grown as an annual

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Magenta (pink-purple)

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

N/A

Bloom Size:

Under 1"

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Birmingham, Alabama

Farmville, North Carolina

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Feb 3, 2019, A from Ashford,
United Kingdom wrote:

Anyone know where I can buy this plant/cuttings? I live in the UK

Positive

On Oct 9, 2017, JennysGarden_TN from Collierville, TN wrote:

Vernonia amygdalina grows well for me in a container. It is an easy plant to grow.

Positive

On Oct 16, 2014, Ted_B from Birmingham, AL (Zone 8a) wrote:

African bitterleaf is as common in West African cuisine as is spinach or cabbage in western dishes. And while dried leaf can be obtained from African markets, fresh leaves and live plant/cuttings/seeds seem virtually impossible to obtain commercially outside of that continent. Stewed leaves give a pleasant piquant kick to stewed meat dishes, somewhat like collard greens, although they should be shredded, soaked in water, and squeezed to reduce the bitterness. Recent studies support the health benefits attributed to this important ethnobotanical crop.

Plants prefer rich garden soil in a sunny position, with ample moisture, and respond favorably to periodic fertilizer applications. Pruning of older stems provides fresh leaves for the kitchen - a good excuse to learn cooking W... read more

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