Sophora Species, Necklace Pod

Sophora alopecuroides subsp. tomentosa

Family: Fabaceae (fab-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sophora (SOF-or-uh) (Info)
Species: alopecuroides subsp. tomentosa
Synonym:Goebelia alopecuroides var. tomentosa
Synonym:Sophora alopecuroides var. tomentosa

Category:

Shrubs

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Succulent

Foliage Color:

Bronze

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Blooms all year

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Big Pine Key, Florida

Boca Raton, Florida

Bradenton Beach, Florida

Cape Coral, Florida

Fort Myers, Florida

Hobe Sound, Florida(2 reports)

Hollywood, Florida

Jacksonville, Florida

Jupiter, Florida

Key Largo, Florida

Lakeland, Florida

Miami, Florida

Naples, Florida

New Port Richey, Florida

North Port, Florida

Oldsmar, Florida

Pompano Beach, Florida(2 reports)

Saint Petersburg, Florida

Sarasota, Florida(2 reports)

Sebastian, Florida

Vero Beach, Florida

Wauchula, Florida

Lake Charles, Louisiana

Austin, Texas

Belton, Texas

Harlingen, Texas

Houston, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On May 9, 2008, redzone911 from Pinellas, FL wrote:

There has been confusion between the native and non-native necklace pods. An easy way to tell the difference is to look at the leaves. The native necklace pods (var. truncata) have bright, deep green leaves, smooth, and little shiny. Non-native necklace pods (var. occidentalis) have fuzzy foliage with a silvery look.

Neutral

On Oct 22, 2001, Floridian from Lutz, FL (Zone 9b) wrote:

This is an endangered native of South Florida and the American tropics. A yellow-flowering shrub, it blooms throughout the year. It likes a sunny location and attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Necklace-like seed pods are attractive, but poisonous if eaten. New leaves have an unusual silvery, velvety texture. Salt and drought tolerant.

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