Fen Nettle, Stingless Nettle

Urtica galeopsifolia

Family: Urticaceae
Genus: Urtica (UR-ti-kuh) (Info)
Species: galeopsifolia

Category:

Vegetables

Herbs

Perennials

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Succulent

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Direct sow as soon as the ground can be worked

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 27, 2021, JohannsGarden from Buckley, WA wrote:

I've been enjoying Fen Nettle as a more garden friendly replacement for common Stinging Nettle. Yes, it still CAN sting, but I've tested my plant out lots of times and find that overall the stinging hairs are softer than on stinging nettles meaning that it's much easier to avoid getting stung when handling fen nettles (the hairs do stiffen up on older parts of the stem and leaves).

Stinging qualities aside, what makes the fen nettle really suitable for garden conditions is that fact that it grows as a clumping perennial rather than a rampant runner so will not clonally spread itself all over your garden. Even by seed it can't spread unless you have both a male and female clone present, but the only clone I have appears to be male anyway.

Positive

On Jul 21, 2015, scirpidiella from Pińczw,
Poland (Zone 6b) wrote:

Urtica galeopsifolia it is perennial to about 2m tall. Its leaves and tops of shoots have not stinging hairs, but lower parts of stems have them (and burn when touched as stinging nettle - U. dioica). This species has also very long and narrow, pubescent leaves - in comparison to wider and shorter leaves of stinging nettle. It is also later in flowers - in mid July (U. dioica in mid June, so one month earlier) and has first inflorescences on 13-22 node since base (U. dioica on 7-14 node). Fen Nettle does not grow on synanthropic sites - it grows only on natural communities - on winter-flooded wet natural thickets, edges of rivers, wet woodlands etc. U. galeopsifolia is diploid. U. dioica is tetraploid and it is probably hybrid of U. galeopsifolia and other nettle species. It is unknown if... read more

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