Giant Hog Fennel

Peucedanum verticillare

Family: Apiaceae (ay-pee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Peucedanum (pew-SED-an-um) (Info)
Species: verticillare
Synonym:Tommasinia verticillare

Category:

Biennials

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are good for cutting

Flowers are good for drying and preserving

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Chartreuse (Yellow-Green)

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Herbaceous

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

This plant is monocarpic

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Dec 23, 2015, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

A sophisticated, statuesque plant with a down-home name. Rarely found in gardens, but common in the wild where it is native (Southeastern Europe to Asia).

This species grows two to five years before flowering, each season producing a low rosette of glossy deeply divided leaves. The leaves bear a passing resemblance to celery or ground elder. The plant develops a massive tap root, so it's difficult/impossible to transplant except when very young.

When it's stored enough energy, it sends up a single well-branched, glaucous purple candelabra-like flowering stalk bearing few leaves but many flat umbels of pale yellow to chartreuse flowers. Flower stalks average 6' but can reach as much as 10'.

Despite its height, this is a see-through plant, suitabl... read more

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