Tabletop Scotch Elm ''Horizontalis''

Ulmus glabra

Family: Ulmaceae (ulm-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Ulmus (ULM-us) (Info)
Species: glabra (GLAY-bruh) (Info)
Cultivar: 'Horizontalis'

Category:

Trees

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By grafting

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Ames Lake, Washington

Redmond, Washington

Union Hill-Novelty Hill, Washington

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 18, 2021, jsyrett from Ames Lake, WA wrote:

Marymoor Park in Redmond, WA has a prime example of this tree.

The contrast of the winter, leafless structured branches to the full lush state is striking. Photos available.

Neutral

On Jun 16, 2016, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

I came upon a specimen of the Tabletop Scotch Elm planted at Morris Arboretum in northwest Philadelphia on June 15th 2016 with my camera. I thought it was the very similar Camperdown Scotch Elm, but it was labeled as the Tabletop being 'Horizontalis.' Many of the grafted cultivar considered as 'Camperdownii' really are the 'Horizontalis' cultivar in the USA according to Dr. Michael Dirr, my old woody plant teacher once at the University of Illinois. The mother species of Scotch Elm is very rare in the USA, but either of these two weeping cultivars are very infrequently found planted, mostly in the yards of affluent households. I've only seen about 5 in my life so far; 3 in Illinois and 2 in Pennsylvania.

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