It's time to vote on our 2017 photo contest! Vote for your favorite photos of the year here!

Kadsura Species, Xưn xe tạp, 异形南五味子

Kadsura heteroclita

Family: Schisandraceae
Genus: Kadsura (kad-SOO-ruh) (Info)
Species: heteroclita
Synonym:Kadsura acuminata
Synonym:Kadsura billitonensis
Synonym:Kadsura championii
Synonym:Kadsura interior
Synonym:Kadsura parvifolia

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Perennials

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Vines and Climbers

Foliage Color:

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Where to Grow:

Grow outdoors year-round

Suitable for growing in containers

This plant is suitable for growing indoors

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Partial to Full Shade

Full Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Orange

Red-Orange

Pale Yellow

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Evergreen

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

By simple layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Birmingham, Alabama

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 21, 2017, Ted_B from Birmingham, AL (Zone 8a) wrote:

This tropical climber is indigenous to mountainous regions of SE Asia, where it inhabits shady areas at 800-2000m that remain reasonably humid and receive regular moisture. While its bizarre, edible fruit is valued in ethnobotany, little information seems to be available concerning commercial viability. Virtually absent from western collections, it doesn't seem to have a common name in English.

Like members of the closely related Schisandra genus and other Kadsura species, this one is often reported as dioecious, but is actually monoecious, although evolved in a manner that discourages self-pollination. And like other members of these two genera, this one succeeds in well drained, but consistently moist soil, with minimal exposure to direct sunlight in hot climates. This par... read more

BACK TO TOP