Our 19th Annual Photo Contest is now open for entries. You can submit your best images HERE

Anise

Pimpinella anisum

Family: Apiaceae (ay-pee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Pimpinella (pim-pi-NEL-uh) (Info)
Species: anisum (uh-NISS-um) (Info)
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Annuals

Herbs

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Shiny/Glossy

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Collect seedhead/pod when flowers fade; allow to dry

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Austin, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Mar 4, 2007, berrygirl from Braselton, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

One of the oldest known spices in England, that first appeared in the Grocer's Company of London. Added to bread and sausage in Italy for centuries. Wonderful strong licorice flavor.Very easy to grow, similar to dill in habit, harvest seeds when dry. Annual.

Positive

On Jan 27, 2003, lupinelover from Grove City, OH (Zone 6a) wrote:

Anise should be direct-sown in the garden, unless grown in a short-season climate. It needs a lot of warmth to initiate flowering and seed-set.

For a real sensory addition to your garden, plant a couple where you will brush by the plant as you walk past.

Positive

On Jan 9, 2003, cristina from Temuco,
Chile (Zone 9b) wrote:

Beautiful and delicate-looking plant, feather-like leaflets of bright green leaves, the thin stems are topped with umbrella-like clusters of white yellowish flowers, which are heavy enough to make the stems flop.

Cut a few leaves to put in salads. Harvest the seed heads and hang them over newspaper in a warm, airy location to dry.

Store in an airtight jar in a cool, dark place. Use seeds to flavor cookies and breads.

BACK TO TOP