Japanese Arrowhead

Sagittaria sagittifolia

Family: Alismataceae
Genus: Sagittaria (saj-ee-TAR-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: sagittifolia (sag-it-ee-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)
Synonym:Sagittaria trifolia

Category:

Ponds and Aquatics

Water Requirements:

Very high moisture needs; suitable for bogs and water gardens

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Smooth

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

New Orleans, Louisiana

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
1
negative
RatingContent
Neutral

On Feb 1, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

A good substitute for this water plant is Sagittaria latifolia, a very similar species that's native to N. America. Be prepared, it's very aggressive, but it's a common native plant here in the US and not a threat to the environment. It's also much hardier, Z3-10.

Negative

On Nov 25, 2004, caron from Woodland Park, CO (Zone 4b) wrote:

U. S. FEDERALLY LISTED NOXIOUS WEED.
Not allowed for import to the US and not allowed in any interstate or intrastate transportation without a specific permit from USDA APHIS PPQ (Plant Protection and Quarantine).

Neutral

On May 16, 2002, Baa wrote:

A marginal, perennial, pond plant from Europe and Asia.

Has mid-green, arrow shaped leaves with 2 acute lobes. Bears long stems (up to 3ft) of white flowers, each petal has a purple spot at the base.

Flowers June-September

Needs a pond to grow successfully. Plant no deeper than 1ft under the water in full sun.

Has an indefinite spread so you will need to cut it back to a manageable size at the end of summer. Take off the old flowers to prevent it from seedling everywhere.

Very tenacious of life, the vagaries of living in our back garden has seen several leaves knocked off in spring. The plant then produced leaves from very nearly the same spot as the old leaves. Be sure you really want to grow this plant!

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