Puncturevine, Caltrop, Goat's Head, Bullhead

Tribulus terrestris

Family: Zygophyllaceae
Genus: Tribulus (TRY-bew-lus) (Info)
Species: terrestris (ter-RES-triss) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Herbs

Water Requirements:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Smooth

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

6-9 in. (15-22 cm)

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Carrick, California

Aurora, Colorado

Denver, Colorado

Lamar, Colorado

Springfield, Colorado

Elephant Butte, New Mexico

Avon, North Carolina

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

San Antonio, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
2
neutrals
2
negatives
RatingContent
Negative

On Mar 4, 2009, Kylaluaz from Richmond, VA (Zone 7a) wrote:

Well, interesting that it has a traditional medicinal usage. We called them sandspurs when I was growing up and lived for a while in Southwest Texas. Now here they are again. Me no like. Those burrs also get stuck on the bottoms of your shoes and you can track them in the house that way, so watch out, they hurt!

Neutral

On Dec 15, 2006, frostweed from Josephine, Arlington, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Puncturevine, Caltrop, Goat's Head, Bullhead Tribulus terrestris is naturalized in Texas and other States and is considered an invasive plant in Texas.

Neutral

On Dec 3, 2004, smiln32 from Oklahoma City, OK (Zone 7a) wrote:

The flowers of this plant have been used in the past in the treatment of leprosy. The stems are used in the treatment of skin diseases and psoriasis.

Negative

On Dec 20, 2002, MaryE from Baker City, OR (Zone 5b) wrote:

This plant is a noxious weed. It grows along the sides of our gravel roads in an area where we don't get rain for months in the summer and fall. The county sprays it and still it is not controlled. In the fall the spines are very sharp and can flatten tires. Nobody here likes it and I definitely would not want it in my garden.

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