Torilis Species, Field Hedge Parsley, Spreading Hedgeparsley, Tall Sock-Destroyer

Torilis arvensis

Family: Apiaceae (ay-pee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Torilis (TOR-il-iss) (Info)
Species: arvensis (ar-VEN-sis) (Info)

Category:

Annuals

Biennials

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Foliage:

Herbaceous

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Size:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Cole Camp, Missouri

Dripping Springs, Texas

San Antonio, Texas

Spicewood, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
0
neutrals
3
negatives
RatingContent
Negative

On May 16, 2016, marasri from Dripping Springs, TX wrote:

Annoying plant that spreads and spreads. I have heard it called Spreading Hedge Parsley, Beggar's Lice, Sticky Tights. I have a huge compost pile of it that I pulled before seeds formed. All I can say is YUCK, BUT it is not a considered a biological threat even though it is a non native and annoying plant. Butterfly, beetles and native bees like it and it never forms a monoculture or out competes natives. It might stick to your socks but it plays friendly with the other plants and critters. I am just tired of combing it out of my animals hair.

Negative

On Apr 7, 2008, bjpanke from Madison, WI wrote:

This plant is a serious invasive across the United States. Due to its sticky seeds it is spread easily by people and pets (especially dogs). It then moves into natural areas and out competes native vegetation. If you insist on planting this species in your gardens make sure to remove the seeds and destroy them so that you do not contribute to the spread of this species.

Negative

On Jun 15, 2004, Wingnut from Spicewood, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

INCREDIBLY AGGRAVATING plant when it goes to seed! If you brush against it, even slightly, the seeds will stick to your clothing. If it's socks, forget trying to get them out ~ just throw them away or you'll risk insanity trying to pick all the nasty little buggers off! I once had to shave a dog bare when he went gallavanting through a large patch of them.

The plant has a rather attractive flower, but there are so many others so similar that I wouldn't bother with this one.

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